ginger-and-turmeric-tea-health-boosting_7

 

 

Great for what ails you! Turmeric and ginger both have anti-inflammatory properties, making this an ideal tea if you have a cold. It’s very comforting on a cold winter’s day, served piping hot. But it’s also refreshing as a summer pick-me-up, so keep it in mind when those seasonal allergies strike. It’s also a very good digestive. Fresh turmeric is available at Harris Teeter, Whole Foods, Wegman’s and Asian supermarkets. Fresh ginger is widely available at supermarkets. Adrienne demoed this at Brookside and USBG in January 2016.

Two 2½-inch pieces fresh turmeric root, finely grated
2-inch piece fresh ginger root, finely grated
Few grinds of black pepper
1/4 t ground cinnamon
1/4 C honey
Freshly squeezed juice of ½ a lemon

Combine ingredients in a small jar or bowl. Stir until well blended. Cover with a lid, and store in the fridge. To make the tea, heat 8 ounces of water in a cup and add one teaspoon of the ginger-turmeric mixture. Garnish with a grinding of black pepper.


Chickpea Turmeric Stew with Coconut Bacon

chickpea_turmeric_stew_sweet_potato_thai_red_curry_coconut_bacon_vegan_4Imagine a vegan meal of great, chunky protein (the chickpeas or garbanzo beans), soft, creamy sweet potato distilled in a coconut broth flavored with fresh turmeric and ginger root, floury Yukons to absorb those great juices, topped with crunchy flakes of something smokey, meaty-tasting and incredibly satisfying. “Coconut bacon?” you’re wondering. Make that part ahead of time (the whole thing can be made in advance and kept in the refrigerator a couple days – reheat gently on top of the stove.) But do extra of the “bacon,” as you’ll find all sorts of use for it, from spinach salads to sprinkling on baked potatoes to serving with eggs and hash browns for breakfast.  Adapted from the food blog yupitsvegan.com and demoed by Adrienne at Brookside in January 2016.

For coconut bacon:
1½ C unsweetened coconut flakes
1 T soy sauce (or tamari or liquid aminos)
2 t prepared Thai red curry paste (Thai Kitchen brand is vegan)
½ T pineapple juice
½ T maple syrup
scant 1/4 t liquid smoke

For the chickpea turmeric stew:
3 T olive oil
1 shallot, minced
1 to 2 serrano peppers, finely chopped (depending on your tolerance)
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 T minced fresh ginger
2 T minced fresh turmeric root (about 3 inches) (or use 1½ t dried turmeric, added along with the curry powder)
½ T mild curry powder
1 ~14 oz. can coconut milk (1½ C)
½ C pineapple juice
2 t soy sauce (or tamari or liquid aminos)
1 medium to small potato, cubed
1 medium to small sweet potato, cubed
1½ C chickpeas (one can)
2 T lime juice
salt, to taste
chopped cilantro or green onion, for serving
(optional) rice, for serving

For the coconut bacon:
Preheat the oven to 275 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or non-stick aluminum. Dump the flaked coconut onto the baking sheet. In a small bowl, whisk together the rest of the ingredients, making sure to evenly incorporate the curry paste. Drizzle the mixture over the coconut, and use your hands to toss it to coat. Spread it out in an even layer and place in the oven. Bake for about 20 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes or until the liquid is absorbed/cooked off and the coconut is evenly browned. Let cool before using. The coconut bacon will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for at least a week.
For the chickpea turmeric stew:
In a saucepan, heat a small drizzle of olive oil over medium heat. When the oil is shimmering, add the shallot with a sprinkle of salt; cook until starting to soften, about 2 minutes. Add the pepper, garlic, turmeric, and ginger with another sprinkle of salt, and stir. Cook 3 minutes until the shallot is soft. Add the curry powder and cook for 1 minute, stirring frequently. Stir in the coconut milk, pineapple juice, soy sauce, and cubed potatoes and sweet potatoes, along with another fat pinch of salt. Bring the mixture to a gentle boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and cover. Cook 15-20 minutes or until the potatoes are cooked through. If desired, use the back of your spoon to mash up some of the potatoes to thicken the stew slightly. Stir in the cooked chickpeas and lime juice and let simmer partially covered for 5 minutes. Taste for seasoning. Garnish with cilantro and coconut bacon.

 


Oranges with Caramel, Ginger and Mint

 

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Growing up in Europe, the Cook Sisters have childhood memories of Christmas dinner ending with a fiery plum pudding. It was made a year ahead of time, then steamed for a couple of hours before arriving at the table doused with flaming rum and served up warm with rum butter and Christmas crackers. The fact that we never actually liked the pudding itself never stopped this Old World tradition from being our favorite part of the meal. Scroll forward a few decades, and today we have our own traditions. We offer up this dessert for consideration. It makes a great dinner-party dessert because it’s not heavy, and it’s healthy, which leaves diners feeling virtuous. What could be better to end a Christmas dinner? Don’t answer that. Just enjoy this. We demoed this for Brookside back in 2011. 

oranges5 seedless oranges, such as navel
2 T crystalized ginger
1/3 C sugar
8-10 mint leaves (optional)

Zest one orange and reserve. Trim oranges of their skin and white pith; reserve top and bottom for juice. Cut trimmed orange in half lengthwise and remove core. Lay the halves flat and cut into half-moons. Arrange orange slices on a platter. Using a small paring knife, dice crystalized ginger; mix with orange zest and scatter over orange slices. In a small, heavy saucepan, heat 2 T water and the sugar until they begin to boil. Turn the heat to medium and simmer 5 minutes until sugar turns to medium brown; remove from heat. Carefully drizzle caramelized sugar over prepared orange slices; the sugar will bubble and sizzle and harden in place. Squeeze juice from reserved orange ends over the caramel. Scatter mint over all and serve within an hour for maximum crunchiness.


Mushroom Sour Cream Salad

mushroom

 

 

Trying to eat “light” in the lead-up to this week — three Christmas dinners on the calendar and that doesn’t include the famous Garreau tortiere, handed down to Adrienne from her late mother-in-law. That recipe may not be ready to post just yet, but this mushroom salad certainly is. It’s light yet satisfying, even — dare we say it for a salad? — comforting. The combination of the sour cream and walnuts is part of that. But, in a non-obvious way, the mushrooms themselves have both a meatiness and an almost souffle-like airiness. Use the freshest mushrooms you can find and stick with real sour cream if at all possible to get the creaminess just right. The salad needs at least a half-hour for the flavors to meld and the mushrooms to release some of their moisture into the dressing.

1/4 C chopped walnuts
2 C sliced very fresh white button mushrooms (about one 8-oz box)
1/3 C sour cream
2 T lemon juice
1/4 C minced scallions, green and white parts combined
1/4 t cayenne pepper
salt and black pepper to taste
chives for garnish

Toasting the walnuts is optional, but I like them better that way. Heat a non-stick pan on medium; add walnut pieces and toast until you get a good, nutty perfume and they are golden. Do not scorch. This will take about five minutes. Remove from heat and cool. In a large bowl, combine the remaining ingredients, except the chives. Add the walnuts; toss well and set the salad aside to marinate for at least a half-hour. You can also make it up to one day ahead of time. Garnish with chives and serve. Two to three servings.


Lentil Salad with Fennel and Smoked Salmon

lentil

 

The weather of late is calling more for salads than soup. We know of course that’s going to change. This salad is like a bridge — or maybe a hybrid (hybridge?). It marries tastes of the season — smoked salmon anyone? — hardy fare — lentils, after all — with light treatment in a wonderful Asian-inspired dressing. It seems an unlikely combination but don’t be fooled. You’ll enjoy it for lunch or as a dinner with soup (when the inevitable chill comes back) and crusty bread. The original recipe is from Fine Cooking.

2 C cooked lentils (Melissa’s or Trader Joe’s)
1 medium clove garlic, pressed through a garlic press
Kosher salt
½ medium shallot, finely chopped (about 1½ Tbs.)
3 Tbs. rice vinegar
2 tsp. finely grated fresh ginger (use small holes on a box grater)
1 tsp. Dijon mustard
½ tsp. fennel seed, busted up in a mortar and pestle
Freshly ground black pepper
1/3 cup oil (canola or olive)
9 small radishes, halved and thinly sliced (about 1 cup)
½ small bulb fennel, quartered lengthwise and thinly sliced crosswise (about 1 cup), plus 1 Tbs. chopped fennel fronds
chopped parsley
4 oz. cold-smoked salmon, cut into ½-inch squares (about ½-cup)

Whisk garlic, shallot, vinegar, ginger, mustard, fennel seed, 1½ tsp. salt, and ¼ tsp. pepper. Whisk in the oil.

In a large bowl, toss the lentils, radishes, fennel, fennel fronds, and chives with just enough of the vinaigrette to coat everything lightly. Season to taste with salt and pepper. (You can prepare the salad to this point up to 4 hours ahead.) Just before serving, gently stir in the salmon and a few grinds of pepper. Garnish with parsley.


Savory Crustless Popovers

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3 eggs
2/3 C half and half
½ C plain lowfat yogurt
1 T unsalted butter, melted
1/3 C flour
½ t salt
4 oz. mild cheddar, shredded
2 T each fresh parsley and chives, finely chopped (or other herbs of your choice)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Whisk together the eggs, half and half, yogurt and butter. Add the flour and salt, stir in the cheddar and herbs. Fill greased ramekins or mini-muffin tins until 3/4 full, and bake for 20 minutes, or until set, puffy and lightly brown on top. Let popovers cool at least 10 minutes before unmolding (they will fall slightly, this is normal!). Gently invert to unmold. Serve warm or at room temperature. Makes 12 standard muffins.


Marinated Goat Cheese with Citrus, Olive Oil and Herbs

Adapted from Chef Todd Knoll of Jordan Winery. Knoll likes to pair this with a good Chardonnay. This easy and flavorful appetizer can be adapted year-round by changing the citrus with the seasons.

CitrusMarinatedCheese

1/4 pound aged goat cheese (Cypress Grove Midnight Moon or a Manchego may be substituted)
4 broadly peeled rind pieces of one blood orange, pith removed (any seasonal citrus)
4 broadly peeled rind pieces of one Meyer lemon, pith removed
10 whole black peppercorns
5 whole white peppercorns
1 C candied kumquats, halved (2 Tbsp of English marmalade may be substituted)
1 blood orange, peeled and divided into segments (any seasonal citrus with minimal seeds may be substituted)
6 sprigs thyme
2-4 bay leaves, whole
¼ C olive oil
Coarse or flaky sea salt, to taste

Slice cheese into 1⁄8-inch thick triangles. Use a vegetable peeler to broadly peel citrus rinds (approximate length: 2-3 inches). In a nonreactive bowl, combine sliced cheese with orange and lemon rinds, black and white peppercorns, marmalade or kumquats, 8 blood orange segments, 4 thyme sprigs and bay leaves. Add olive oil and gently toss.

Cover and set aside to marinate at room temperature for eight hours or in a refrigerator a minimum of 24 hours (or up to three days).

To serve, bring the cheese marinade up to room and toss gently again in same bowl to refresh ingredients. Arrange the cheese slices and marinade naturally on a platter. Top with a few more citrus rinds that have not been marinated. Drizzle with additional olive oil. Garnish with a few fresh thyme sprigs and salt to taste. Serves 6 -8.