Baker’s Dozen Holiday Recipes from the Archives

Below are some of the dishes we’ve worked on over the years that have made their way to our holiday tables. We have many favorites, and more can be found by searching the website under a particular ingredient (Adrienne’s Persimmon Pudding, anyone?).  Wishing that the holidays find you in a place of love and good food.  Just bring your appetite!



A wonderful new twist on cranberry relish, try this with your turkey this year.

Cranberry-Fig Chutney


deviledeggs-asparagusWe re-introduced these perennial favorites at a demo at US Botanic Garden earlier in the fall and decided they would be on our holiday buffet table.

Asparagus Deviled Eggs






This dish has such special beauty, it will make your holiday table look spectacular and it tastes pretty great too.

Ombre Carrots and Chard



carrotAnother one that would work great for the buffet table or serve the souffles as hors d’oeuvres, without the extra veggies, but topped with a small dollop of mascarpone, softened to room temperature.

Mini Carrot Souffles with Baby Vegetables


creamy greensKids (kids!) can’t get enough of this. A must for our Thanksgiving table.

Creamy Winter Greens au Gratin



A sprightly twist on Brussels sprouts that will enliven any holiday buffet.

Brussels sprouts with lemon and hazelnuts


Lemon Pepper Green Beans {Blogsgiving 2015} // The Speckled PalateThanksgiving brings out the competitive spirit in our family and the sweet potato dish is at the forefront when it comes to making the best side. This one’s likely to win hands-down — and no one will miss the marshmallows.


Bourbon Sweet Potato Casserole





Gorgeous on the dessert table, but equally at home as an accompaniment to ham, pork, a lovely roast tenderloin. Use your imagination but count this one in.


                       Citrus Salad with Spiced Honey



With a bright, addictive flavor that is all holiday and deeply warming, this soup is a winter staple in our household. Freeze it for drop-in guests or roll it out on a blustery day that sends you scrambling for comfort food, even just for lunch.

Butternut-Tangerine Soup




We love this as a refreshing non-alcoholic drink, but it’s also a great flavoring for alcoholic drinks — try it with a shot of vodka or drizzled in a chablis or sauvignon blanc.

                                                            Cranberry-Lime Shrub

red cabbage


There are plenty of ways to fix red cabbage, the perennial favorite for the holiday buffet or dinner table. This one adds the crunch and flavor of chestnuts. What a great marriage.

Red Cabbage with Chestnuts



Tired of green bean casserole? Try these and be prepared for a new Thanksgiving tradition at your table.

Green Beans with Meyer Lemon



If you like to combine the cheese and salad course, try this salad, which, like the cheese platter, includes fruit and nuts.

Radicchio, Pear and Pecan Salad

Farro Soup with Curry Powder, Lentils and Salted Lemon Yogurt



Packed with flavor and protein, this soup is a meal unto itself — just add crusty bread and a fruity cobbler for dessert and you’ll be feasting on comfort food at its best — and so so healthy! You’ll be ready to run a marathon the next morning — especially if you repeat for breakfast. This is from from “Super Natural Every Day,” by Heidi Swanson, which you might want to consider putting under the tree of your favorite cook (you know who that is). It was adapted by Danielle for a cooking class at Brookside November 18 2015.

2 T extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for serving
2 yellow onions, chopped
1 C peeled, diced sweet potato or butternut squash
Sea salt
1 T plus 2 t Indian curry powder
2/3 C farro
1 ¼ C green or black lentils, picked over and rinsed
6-8 C low sodium vegetable broth
1 C plain yogurt of Greek-style yogurt
Grated zest and juice of 1/2 lemon, or to taste

Heat the oil in a large soup pot over medium-high heat. Stir in the onions and sweet potato. Add a big pinch of salt and sauté until the onions soften a bit, a couple of minutes. Add the curry powder; stir until onions and sweet potatoes are coated and the curry is fragrant, a minute or so. Add the farro, lentils and 6 cups of the broth. Bring to a boil, lower heat, and simmer, covered, for 40-50 minutes. Taste and season with more salt, if needed. (Don’t under-salt or the soup will taste flat.) While the soup is cooking, in a small bowl, stir together the yogurt, lemon zest and juice, and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Serve each bowl of soup topped with a dollop of lemon yogurt and a drizzle of olive oil. Serves 8-10.

Kabocha Wheatberry Salad




An Autumnal combination — you get the sweetness, nuttiness, crunch, and the tahini in the dressing brings it all together. Kabocha is Japan’s pumpkin — slightly flattened and green dappled with white. Its flavor is similar to pumpkin, but sweeter. If you can’t find kabocha squash, substitute acorn or delicata. With its assertive creaminess and mild saltiness, the French feta, made from sheep’s milk, is particularly good in this dish, but you can definitely substitute your favorite feta. This recipe was adapted from the blog by Adrienne for a class Brookside November 18 2015. 

1 kabocha squash
½# shiitake mushrooms
1/4 C olive oil
1 C of wheatberries, cooked
1/3 C hazelnuts
2 large handfuls of baby arugula or kale
French feta

1 T tahini
1 T honey
juice of 1 large lemon
1 T apple cider vinegar
1/4 C extra virgin olive oil (more as needed)
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Preheat the oven 400 degrees. Halve kabocha across its equator and scoop out seeds; using a large chef’s knife, cut squash into wedges. Toss wedges with half the olive oil and lightly season with sea salt and black pepper. Roast squash 25-30 minutes until tender. Remove and discard stems from shiitake; slice tops into strips. Toss in extra virgin olive oil and lightly season with sea salt and black pepper. Roast in the 400 degree oven for 10-15 minutes until they begin to get dark and crispy around the edges. (You can also roast the shiitake and squash together, just remember to remove the shiitake before the squash).Toast the hazelnuts in a small pan over medium heat. Keep the hazelnuts moving to prevent them from burning. When you begin to smell their fragrance, remove them from the pan. Cool and chop roughly.

Dressing: In a small bowl, whisk tahini and honey; add lemon juice and vinegar and incorporate well; slowly add olive oil and continue whisking until the ingredients are emulsified and the dressing is smooth; if the dressing is too thick, add more olive oil to achieve the right consistency. Season with salt and pepper.

To assemble the salad, arrange the squash wedges on a plate. Combine the arugula, hazelnuts, shiitake mushrooms, and wheatberries in a bowl and toss with dressing. Place the salad between the wedges and top with several cubes of French feta; drizzle with additional olive oil.

Glorious Guava Banana Pineapple Smoothie




Danielle did this as a demo at the U.S. Botanic Garden on October 31, 2015, in celebration of Bat Week. Bats love guava, but maybe more importantly they are pollinators of bananas, guava and the agave cactus. Bats act as our unseen gardener for many plant-based foods around the world.  For more information on these beneficial little mammals, go to:

½ banana, frozen
½ C pineapple chunks, frozen
¼ – ½ C guava juice
¼ C silken tofu
1 t fresh squeezed lemon juice
Agave nectar, to taste

Process all ingredients in a blender until smooth. Makes 1 (15-ounce) smoothie.


Cranberry & Fig Chutney with Walnuts





A perfect accompaniment for all of the holiday cooking ahead, this side dish is a new spin on an old favorite. Don’t overcook it, you want it luscious and thick, not sticky.

12 ounces fresh cranberries
¼ C onion, minced
1 C light brown sugar
½ C orange juice
½ C apple cider vinegar
¼ C raisins
8 dried black mission figs, cut into eighths
1 T fresh ginger, finely minced
½ t ground cinnamon
½ t red pepper flakes
1/3 C walnuts, toasted and roughly chopped

Add all the ingredients, with the exception of the chopped walnuts, to a medium pot and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to bring the mix to a simmer, and cook for 20-25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the chutney thickens some. Remove from the heat, stir in the nuts and let cool slightly before serving. Serves 12-15.




Freekeh Pilaf




Freekeh is the young, green wheat that has been cracked and toasted. It’s a healthy, whole grain and can be substituted for bulgur. This recipe was inspired by Ottolenghi, the great Isreali chef who has several terrific restuarants in the UK. It was demoed by Danielle as part of our “50 Shades of Grain” series in October and November 2015.

 1 large onion, thinly slice
2 T olive oil
2/3 C freekeh
1 C vegetable broth
1/8 t ground cinnamon
1/8 t ground allspice
1 C Greek yogurt
2 t fresh squeezed lemon juice
½ garlic clove, minced
1 T each – fresh chopped parsley, mint and/or cilantro
2 T pine nuts, toasted (can substitute sliced almonds, pumpkin seeds, pistachios, walnuts or pecans)

Heat the olive oil in a large heavy-based pot and add the sliced onion. Cook on medium heat, stirring occasionally until the onion is soft and brown, about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, rinse the freekeh in cold water to remove any film or residue. Add the freekeh, cinnamon and allspice to the onions, followed by the broth. Bring to a simmer, cover and reduce the heat to a bare minimum and leave to simmer for 15 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and leave it covered for another 5 minutes. Remove the lid and fluff to allow steam out and the pilaf to cool down a bit.

While the pilaf is cooling, mix together the yogurt, lemon juice, garlic and a bit of salt. Taste and adjust for more lemon or salt. When the pilaf has released it’s steam and cooled a bit, add the chopped herbs and nuts. Stir well, taste and adjust for salt. Serve with a generous dollop of yogurt on top and a trickle of olive oil, if desired. Serves 2-4.

Red Rice and Quinoa Salad with Orange and Pistachios


red riceWith a sumptuous blend of sweet and savory, this dish, from the great Isreali chef, is classic Yotam Ottolenghi. It’s a little bit Middle Eastern, a little bit European, and a lot delicious. Red rice, like black rice, is densely nutritious and incredibly flavorful, with earthy, nutty notes a long ways from the blandness of white or even brown rice.

¼ C shelled pistachios, toasted and chopped
1 C quinoa, cooked and cooled
1 C red rice, cooked and cooled (see instructions, below)
1 medium white onion, sliced
1 small zucchini, diced
½ C olive oil
grated zest and juice of one orange
2 T lemon juice
1 garlic clove, crushed
¼ t red pepper flakes
4 spring onions, thinly sliced
½ C dried apricots, roughly chopped
2 handfuls of arugula (optional)
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Saute the white onion in 4 tablespoons of the olive oil until golden; add zucchini and saute until crisp-tender. Let cool completely. In a large mixing bowl combine the rice, quinoa, cooked onion and the remaining oil. Add all the rest of the ingredients, taste and adjust the seasoning. Serve at room temperature.
TO COOK RED RICE: Heat 3 teaspoons olive oil in a medium size saute pan. When hot add 1 cup red rice. Fry, stirring, until rice is lightly browned and starting to pop like popcorn. Add 2 cups hot water and bring to a boil. Cover and cook, without stirring, for 20-25 minutes or until barely tender. Remove covered pan from heat and let rest for 15 minutes. Drain rice in a fine mesh strainer. Let cool.