Raw Beet Salad with Orange Supremes and Spring Greens

This salad is not only beautiful with different colored beets, but it is packed with antioxidants, vitamin A and C, iron, potassium, folic acid and fiber.

½ lb. raw beets, a mix of colors if possible (about 4 small or 3 medium), peeled

1 orange, peeled and segmented (“supremes”)

6 C spring greens, washed and spun dry

¼ C fresh chives, finely cut, or other fresh herbs of your choice (tarragon, basil)

Optional – crumbled feta cheese or soft goat cheese, for garnish

Dressing

1 T white wine or champagne vinegar

1 T fresh lemon juice

1 t Dijon mustard

3 T extra virgin olive oil

½ t sea salt

Peel the beets and, using a hand guard, carefully slice them paper thin on a mandolin or hand-held slicer. (If you don’t have a mandolin or a hand-held slicer, you can grate the beets, but it will change the texture and look of the salad.) Set the sliced beets aside and prepare the orange: cut both end off the orange, stand it on one side and guide the knife down to the bottom end, following the shape of the fruit. Remove the rind and as much of the white pith as you can. Slice along the inside of the membrane, gently removing each segment into a bowl.

In a small bowl or jar, mix together the vinegar, lemon juice and Dijon mustard. Drizzle in the olive oil and salt, whisking well to emulsify the dressing. Taste and adjust for salt. Assemble the salad: in a bowl or a deep-dish platter, scatter the spring greens evenly and layer with the beet slices and oranges. Drizzle half the dressing over the salad, and toss gently to coat the salad greens, taking care not to break apart the orange supremes. Garnish with finely-sliced chives and/or fresh herbs of you choice. Serves 6.

½ lb. raw beets, a mix of colors if possible (about 4 small or 3 medium), peeled

1 orange, peeled and segmented (“supremes”)

6 C spring greens, washed and spun dry

¼ C fresh chives, finely cut, or other fresh herbs of your choice (tarragon, basil)

Optional – crumbled feta cheese or soft goat cheese, for garnish

Dressing

1 T white wine or champagne vinegar

1 T fresh lemon juice

1 t Dijon mustard

3 T extra virgin olive oil

½ t sea salt

Peel the beets and, using a hand guard, carefully slice them paper thin on a mandolin or hand-held slicer. (If you don’t have a mandolin or a hand-held slicer, you can grate the beets, but it will change the texture and look of the salad.) Set the sliced beets aside and prepare the orange: cut both end off the orange, stand it on one side and guide the knife down to the bottom end, following the shape of the fruit. Remove the rind and as much of the white pith as you can. Slice along the inside of the membrane, gently removing each segment into a bowl.

In a small bowl or jar, mix together the vinegar, lemon juice and Dijon mustard. Drizzle in the olive oil and salt, whisking well to emulsify the dressing. Taste and adjust for salt. Assemble the salad: in a bowl or a deep-dish platter, scatter the spring greens evenly and layer with the beet slices and oranges. Drizzle half the dressing over the salad, and toss gently to coat the salad greens, taking care not to break apart the orange supremes. Garnish with finely-sliced chives and/or fresh herbs of you choice. Serves 6.


Soupe au Pistou

This is France’s spring/summer equivalent of Italian Minestrone. Since the list of vegetables is long, just use what you have on hand, including a different bean and/or pasta. As summer vegetables become more prolific, you can use a variety of beans and squash.

1 small onion, chopped

3 tablespoons olive oil

Vegetables – pick and choose based upon your availability:

2 leeks, white and pale-green parts only, halved lengthwise, thinly sliced crosswise, washed well, and drained

2 small celery stalks, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

1 medium carrot, cut into small dice


1 small zucchini, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

1 small yellow squash, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

2 small tomatoes, chopped or ½ can (15oz) diced tomatoes

3 small red bliss potatoes, cut into ½-inch pieces

1 C fresh or frozen green beans, cut into ½ inch piece

1 C fresh or frozen peas

1 can (15oz.) small white beans, such as navy, rinsed and drained

5-6 C vegetable or chicken broth

1 Parmesan rind, about 1 by 3 inches
 (-optional)

¼ cup small pasta, such as elbow, small shells, ditalini or stars (-optional)

Sea salt and pepper to taste

Pistou – if fresh herbs are not available, top the soup with a bit of fresh lemon zest

1 C lightly packed basil leaves (can substitute parsley or cilantro)

1-2 cloves garlic

1/3 C grated parmesan

¼ C olive oil

Soup: Heat oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion, leeks and celery. Cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are soft and golden in spots, about 10 minutes. 


Stir in zucchini, squash, tomatoes, potatoes, green beans, broth, and Parmesan rind. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer until vegetables are tender, about 15 minutes. Stir in beans and simmer, covered, just until warmed through, about 2 minutes. Remove rind. 


Pistou: Pulse together the basil, garlic, Parmesan, and oil in a food processor to a loose paste. Season with sea salt and pepper.

Serve each bowl with a small dollop of pistou. Serves 6-8.


It’s Thyme for Marinated Mushrooms

4oz. white button or cremini mushrooms, brushed clean and sliced thin

Juice of 1 lemon (2-3 T)

¼ C extra virgin olive oil

1 T fresh thyme leaves, chopped (or 1 t dried)

1 clove garlic, minced

½ t sea salt – more to taste

Fresh chopped parsley, for garnish

Toss sliced mushrooms with remaining ingredients. Marinate 1 hour at room temperature or up to 3 hours in the refrigerator. The mushrooms can also be quartered, which is nice if you are using them for an appetizer platter (poke with a toothpick); if you choose to quarter the mushrooms, marinating time may be slightly longer. Serve chilled. Serves 2-3.

Note: mushrooms will be fine the following day although the texture will be softer, well-marinated and release a lot of juice.


Chilled Blueberry Soup

This sweet and creamy blueberry soup is a delightfully refreshing treat during the spring and summer months. Makes 4 servings

 

4 C fresh blueberries

1 C orange juice

½ C sugar

1/4 t ground cinnamon

1/8 t salt

1 T fresh lemon juice

1 pint half-and-half

Mint sprigs for garnish

 

Bring first 5 ingredients to a boil in a saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring often. Remove from heat, and slightly cool. Process blueberry mixture and lemon juice in a blender or food processor until smooth, stopping to scrape down sides. Cover and chill until ready to serve.

 

Stir in half-and-half just before serving. Serve in stemmed glasses. Garnish, if desired.

 

 

 

 

 


Baby Potatoes with Coconut Flakes and Mustard Seeds

potaotes

 

A delectable complement to any Indian cuisine. Try substituting green beans, cut into thirds, for the potatoes.

1 lb. baby potatoes
2 T coconut oil or ghee
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ t turmeric
1 t whole mustard seeds (yellow or black)
1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced
¼ C water or broth
¼ C dried unsweetened coconut flakes
Sea salt

Scrub the potatoes to clean. If using larger potatoes, cut them into large chunks. Pat them dry with a dish towel or paper towel. Heat the oil or ghee in large skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic, turmeric and mustard seeds. When the seeds begin to sizzle, add the potatoes. Shake the pan so the potatoes are well coated with the oil, lower the heat a bit and continue to sauté the potatoes until they are browned a bit, about 8-10 minutes. Add the jalapeno and water/broth, cover and let simmer until potatoes are tender, about another 8-10 minutes, adding a small amount of water if they begin to dry out. Just before serving, add the coconut flakes and season with salt. Serves 4-6.