Swiss Chard and Onions

sauteed-chard-onions-caraway-b

 

 

A lovely combination, making great use of both the gorgeous Swiss chard currently in farmer’s markets and fully mature sweet onions. The celery and caraway seeds are an unusual addition and really liven up the dish. Serve with a smoky sausage such as grilled kielbasa or andouille.  From Simply Recipes and demoed for our May 2016 allium month.

3 T grapeseed or vegetable oil
2 large onions, sliced ¼-inch to ½-inch wide slices, root to stem
Salt
1 t honey
1 t caraway seeds
½ t celery seed
½ t black pepper
½ t red pepper flakes
1 pound chard, center ribs removed, leaves roughly chopped
2 t sherry vinegar or apple cider vinegar

Heat the olive oil in a large sauté pan over high heat until the oil is almost smoking. Add the onions and toss to coat with oil. Reduce heat to medium-high and sauté for 10-12 minutes stirring often, until the onions are soft and browned on the edges. Sprinkle with salt while the onions are cooking. Add the honey, caraway seeds, celery seeds, and black pepper. Toss well to combine. Add the chard to the onions and mix well with tongs. Cook for another 2-3 minutes until any moisture has evaporated and the chard is wilted. Add the vinegar right before serving.


Spring Greens Sautéed with Capers and Basil

swiss chardThe Crayola colors of rainbow chard brighten farm market stands at this time of the year, their brilliant purples, reds, yellows, pinks, oranges flooding stems and veining the large, crinkled leaves. In the garden rainbow chard Bright Lights is a show stopper, seeming to delight in attracting attention with its candy colors. Stalks and leaves easily top out out at three-plus feet. Chard loves cool temperatures and in June, when the heat of the summer smiles on tomatoes and peppers, it takes a well-deserved break from production in the lead-up to a big come back in the fall, when it shows off again. A real workhorse of a garden vegetable, chard also is rich in iron and calcium and boasts a mild, buttery flavor and more pliant texture than other hardy greens like kale and collards. No wonder chard has become such a popular item at CSAs and farmers’ markets. Showcasing our theme of the month “Colors of Spring,” here’s another terrific way to fix this tasty green vegetable. Danielle demoed this for our April 2015 selection of recipes. 

chard

3 T olive oil
2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
¼ t hot pepper flakes
1 chopped large tomato
2 T drained capers
2 bunches spring greens or 1 lb. baby greens, washed and coarsely chopped (red, green or rainbow Swiss chard, kale, or any combination of greens)
1/4 C fresh basil, chopped
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
Grated Parmesan – optional

Heat the olive oil in a large deep pot, large enough to hold all of the greens. Add the garlic and pepper flakes and sauté a minute until the garlic is fragrant. Add the chopped tomato and capers, cook for 2 minutes. Add the greens, handfuls at a time and cover the pot with a lid to steam the greens. Cook until the greens are all wilted but have not completely changed color, about 2 minutes. (The acidity of the tomato will cause the greens to lose their vibrant color if overcooked.) Just before serving, add the chopped fresh basil and season with salt and pepper. Serve with grated Parmesan on the side, if desired. Serves 4-6.


Ombre Carrots and Chard

Serves 5-6 as a side

8 medium rainbow carrots in various colors
1 bunch swiss or rainbow chard, stems only
10 mint leaves, roughly torn
2 T fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon sumac (optional)
1 t flax or chia seeds (optional)
pinch of salt and cayenne pepper

Peel carrots and slice larger ones lengthwise so they are fairly uniform. Split chard stems as needed to achieve similar uniformity. Bring a large pot of water to boil and add the carrots. Cook for about 5 minutes, remove and cool in an ice water bath. Cook the chard in the same boiling water for 3 minutes, remove and cool in an ice water bath. Whisk together the remaining ingredients in a bowl. On a plate, arrange the carrots and chard by color. Drizzle dressing on top and sprinkle mint leaves. Serve cold or room temperature.


Swiss Chard and Lemon Ricotta Pasta

pasta

 

 

An easy last minute dinner since you may have the ingredients on hand. Kale, spinach and arugula work well too, and if you use spinach or arugula, no need to blanch in hot water. Just toss them in at the end. For a vegetarian version, substitute reconstituted dried mushrooms for the bacon and season with smoked salt. Dried mushrooms, reconstituted by soaking in hot water for 15-30 minutes, have a dense, meaty flavor analogous to bacon or pancetta. This recipe was adapted from Fine Cooking and Danielle made it for a class at Brookside in November 2014.

1 bunch Swiss chard (red, green or rainbow), well washed, ribs stripped and sliced
½ lb spaghetti or other pasta of your choice
¼ lb thick cut bacon, cut into ¼-inch sliceschard
½  large shallot, minced
Olive oil as needed
1/3 C ricotta cheese, whole milk or low fat
2 T Parmesan cheese
Zest from ½ lemon
¼  t salt, to taste
Pinch dried red pepper flakes

Bring a pot of water to a boil over high heat. Blanch the Swiss chard for 2 minutes. Scoop out the chard, and drain well. Rough chop the leaves and set the stem pieces aside. Keep the pot of water boiling, and add the pasta and cook according to package direction. Drain and set aside, retaining about 1 cup of liquid from cooking the noodles.

In a large sauté pan, fry bacon until just crispy. Add the shallot and sauté until soft, adding olive oil if needed. Add the Swiss chard stem pieces and cook another 2-3 minutes, until stems are tender. Add the chard leaves and toss well to break up any clumps. Combine the ricotta and Parmesan cheeses in a small bowl, and add the lemon zest, salt, and red pepper flakes. Add to the Swiss chard mixture in the sauté pan and mix well. Add cooked spaghetti, and some of the pasta water as needed. Serve warm. Serves 2-4.


Winter Greens and Potato Frittata

frittata

 

Any chard – red, green, rainbow, baby – works well in this, but you can also substitute  spinach. Adding potatoes picks up on the traditional Spanish omelette concept and it makes this frittata filling enough for dinner, especially paired with a hearty fall green salad. The frittata also is tasty at room temperature and makes a great appetizer.  Danielle demoed this frittata at the US Botanic Garden in October and it was slurped up by a class of first-graders who were visiting from a local school, where the kids tend a community garden. The recipe was adapted from Fine Cooking.

6 ounces rainbow chard, washed
2 T canola oil
1 t fresh rosemary, finely chopped
3 C (about 1 lb) Yukon Gold potatoes, grated
1 C sweet onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
Pinch of red pepper flakes, optional
10 large eggs
6 ounces Gouda cheese, shredded

Preheat the oven to 400F. Separate the chard stems from the leaves and slice each ¼ inch thick. In a 12-inch oven-safe non-stick skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions, chard stems, grated potatoes and rosemary. Cook until soft and browned in spots, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and red pepper flakes, stir well and spread the mixture evenly in the skillet. Lightly beat the eggs in a medium bowl. Mix in the chard leaves and grated cheese and pour over the potato mixture. Transfer the skillet to the oven and bake until frittata is set, about 15 minutes. Let cool slightly before cutting and serving.