Sweet and Savory Sweet Potato Greens

yam

Yes, you CAN eat the green tops of sweet potatoes that curl and snake above the tubers themselves, tucked safely below the earth. Sweet potato greens — sold in Asian supermarkets as “yam leaf” — in fact come in a variety of color and shape these days, with their growing popularity as ornamental vines. They taste a lot like spinach, are packed with nutrients and farmers are discovering a burgeoning market for these once-tossed-away side harvest to the perennial favorite tuber of fall. Look for the greens in your local farmer’s market — or CSA – starting in June and going through the fall harvest of sweet potatoes. This recipe was demoed by Adrienne in April 2016 as part of our “Top-to-Toe” month.

8 C sweet potato/yam leaves, stems removed, washed
1 T olive oil
½ onion, diced
½ t Dijon mustard
2 t sugar
½ t hot pepper flakes
1 t salt
1-2 T cider vinegar
3/4 C vegetable or chicken stock
2 T dried cranberries
2 T chopped nuts

Heat olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and cook and until softened and translucent, about two min.; add garlic and cook another two minutes until garlic is fragrant. Combine mustard, sugar, salt, hot pepper flakes, one tablespoon vinegar and add to pan, stirring the ingredients together until sugar is dissolved and they are well incorporated. Add stock and bring to a boil over high heat. Stir in the sweet potato leaves, cover and turn heat down to a simmer. Stir in the cranberries and continue simmering until the liquid has reduced by about half, and the cranberries have softened, about 10 min. Season to taste with pepper and more vinegar as desired. Sprinkle with nuts before serving.
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Cranberry & Fig Chutney with Walnuts

FigCranberryRelish

 

 

 

A perfect accompaniment for all of the holiday cooking ahead, this side dish is a new spin on an old favorite. Don’t overcook it, you want it luscious and thick, not sticky.

12 ounces fresh cranberries
¼ C onion, minced
1 C light brown sugar
½ C orange juice
½ C apple cider vinegar
¼ C raisins
8 dried black mission figs, cut into eighths
1 T fresh ginger, finely minced
½ t ground cinnamon
½ t red pepper flakes
1/3 C walnuts, toasted and roughly chopped

Add all the ingredients, with the exception of the chopped walnuts, to a medium pot and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to bring the mix to a simmer, and cook for 20-25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the chutney thickens some. Remove from the heat, stir in the nuts and let cool slightly before serving. Serves 12-15.

 

 

 


Cranberry-Lime Shrub

shrubPopular in colonial times, a shrub is a sweetened fruit and vinegar syrup. It’s mainly used as a drink mixer, as in this recipe, but you can also use it to brighten a pan sauce for chicken or pork, to boost the flavor of a vinaigrette, or to add some zing to whipped cream for a unique dessert topping. Yields about 1 quart shrub, enough for 16 drinks.  This recipe is from the archives. We demoed it at a class at Brookside Garden in November, 2011. We trot it out every year for teetotalers and anyone looking for something fresh and thirst-quenching. Adapted from Fine Cooking.

12 oz. (3 C) cranberries, rinsed and picked over
1 C granulated sugar
3/4 C white wine or apple cider vinegar
lime zest from one lime
Seltzer or water
Vodka (optional)

In a 4-quart saucepan, combine the cranberries, sugar, vinegar, and lime zest with 3 cups of water and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer until the cranberries are completely broken down, about 20 minutes. Let cool.

Purée with an immersion blender or in a food processor. Strain through a fine sieve set over a large bowl, pressing hard on the solids to extract as much liquid as possible.

Per drink, combine 3 to 4 Tbs. of the chilled shrub with one cup cold seltzer or water, or to taste. Add vodka as desired.

The shrub will keep, refrigerated in a jar, for up to two months.