Leeks Mimosa with Toasted Hazelnuts

Dorie Greenspan Leeks Vinaigrette with Mimosa on eatlivetravelwrite.com

 

 

Begin this simple, distinctive side dish by roasting leeks, which mellows them and brings out their sweet side. Give them a drizzle of citrus vinaigrette, and sprinkle on toasted hazelnuts for a pleasant crunch. As a garnish, grated egg yolks are called mimosa (named for the yellow mimosa flower); we use the whites as well, to finish the dish. This recipe is a hearty side dish for four. Store extra vinaigrette in the refrigerator up to three weeks. Adrienne demoed this as part of allium month, May 2016. Recipe adapted from Martha Stewart.

4 large leeks (2 pounds), white and pale-green parts only, halved lengthwise and rinsed well
Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
2 eggs, hardboiled and cooled
1 t Dijon mustard
2 t finely grated orange zest, plus more for garnish
3 T fresh orange juice
1 T fresh lemon juice
1 T minced shallot
3 T extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for brushing
1 ounce (¼ cup) skinless hazelnuts, toasted and chopped

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Arrange leeks on a rimmed baking sheet, and brush generously with oil. Season with salt and pepper. Roast, flipping once, until tender and gold, about 20 minutes. Let cool slightly on sheet. Halve eggs and remove yolks. Finely grate whites on the medium holes of a box grater; place in a small bowl. Grate or crumble yolks; place in another small bowl. Whisk together mustard, orange zest and juice, lemon juice, and shallot. Slowly add oil, whisking until emulsified. Season with salt and pepper. Arrange leeks on a platter. Scatter whites and yolks on top. Drizzle with vinaigrette. Sprinkle with hazelnuts, and garnish with orange zest. Serve immediately.


Savory Crustless Popovers

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3 eggs
2/3 C half and half
½ C plain lowfat yogurt
1 T unsalted butter, melted
1/3 C flour
½ t salt
4 oz. mild cheddar, shredded
2 T each fresh parsley and chives, finely chopped (or other herbs of your choice)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Whisk together the eggs, half and half, yogurt and butter. Add the flour and salt, stir in the cheddar and herbs. Fill greased ramekins or mini-muffin tins until 3/4 full, and bake for 20 minutes, or until set, puffy and lightly brown on top. Let popovers cool at least 10 minutes before unmolding (they will fall slightly, this is normal!). Gently invert to unmold. Serve warm or at room temperature. Makes 12 standard muffins.


Lemon-Almond Torte

The first taste of spring is all about lemons. Sure the bright, fresh zing of lemons is great almost any time, but there’s something about this time of the year when it has particular resonance. It’s a tonic, a cleanser – of palate and gut (and house for that matter) – a lovely foil for fresh herbs, it goes with so many flavors. So before the garden is serving up its first harvest of stalwart baby greens, tightly packed peas, pointy asparagus and early onions; before ramps appear at farmers’ markets, morels raise their dusky, honeycombed fool’s caps; before the heart of summer sneaks up on you, we look to lemons to bring us sprightly flavor and a break from winter’s stews. We offer up a spate of spring recipes, many of which deploy this seasonal citrus – lemons are ripe for the picking where they grow in Southern California, Arizona and other parts of the Southwest.

lemon almond torte

 

This light, lemony cake is based on a traditional Spanish torte. We are accompanying it with ruby-red raspberry sauce for a great spring dessert. It has the ingredients of a souffle and that dish’s characteristic lightness, but cooks up like a cake – you could even glisten it with a lemon glaze instead of serving it with the raspberry sauce. Add a dollop of whipped cream for a touch of decadence, and don’t forget that garnish of fresh raspberries and sprigs of spring mint.  Adrienne demoed this at US Botanic Garden in DC in March 2015.

4 eggs, separated into 4 egg yolks and 4 egg whites, room temperature
2 T lemon zest, packed, from about three large lemons
2 T lemon juice, from about one lemon
1/4 t ground cardamom
½ C white sugar, divided
1½ C almond flour or almond meal (see below)*
1 t baking powder
1 t lemon or lime juice
Pinch of salt
Powdered sugar for sprinkling
Garnish: Fresh raspberries, sprigs of mint

Preheat the oven to 350°. Place a round of parchment paper on the bottom of a 9-inch springform pan, and grease it and the sides of the pan with butter or cooking spray. In a large bowl, beat together with a wooden spoon the egg yolks, lemon zest, and 1/4 C sugar until smooth. Add lemon juice and beat again. In a separate bowl, whisk together almond, cardamom and baking powder. Add the flour mixture to the egg yolk mixture and mix thoroughly. In a separate bowl and using an electric beater, beat egg whites,. As they begin to thicken, add a pinch of salt and the teaspoon of lemon or lime (the salt and the acid from the juice will help the meringue maintain better structure and increase creaminess). As the egg whites begin to increase in volume, sprinkle in the remaining 1/4 C of sugar, a little at a time. Beat until soft peaks form. Fold the meringue into the almond mixture gently to create a light batter. Scoop the batter into a the prepared springform pan and place in the oven. Bake for 25 minutes until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean. Remove from oven and let cool. Run a sharp knife around the edge of the cake helping it to separate from the side of the pan. Release the springform pan sides, and gently move the cake to a cake serving plate. Sprinkle with powdered sugar before serving. Serve with Raspberry Sauce on the side.

Raspberry Sauce

One pint raspberries
2/3 C white sugar

Combine raspberries and sugar in a nio-reactive pan. Cover and cook on low heat about 10 minutes until sugar is fully disolved and the raspberries are comopletely broken down and lost their shape. Remove from heat and cool. Pass mixture through a small-mesh seive. Refrigerate until ready for use. It will keep in the refrigerator up to two weeks.

Lemon Glaze

1C confectioners sugar
1-2 T lemon juice

Combine the confectioners sugar and 1 T lemon juice in a bowl, mix thoroughly, adding more lemon juice as needed to achieve a consisency similar to pancake batter. Spread on cooled almond-lemon torte. Let the glaze harden about 30 minutes before serving.


Carrot Pudding Souffles with Buttered Spring Vegetables

carrotYou can make the souffles a day ahead and refrigerate them, covered, in the ramekins. To reheat, unmold the souffles and place them right side up on a rimmed baking sheet. Pour one-quarter cup heavy cream over top, and heat in a 375-degree oven until heated through and cream is bubbling, about 12 minutes. Or you can microwave them.  Prepare the vegetables while the souffles are in the oven. Adapted from Martha Stewart and demoed in March 2015.

½ C (1 stick) unsalted butter, plus more for ramekins
1 small shallot, thinly sliced (about 1/4 C)
1# carrots, peeled and cut into ½-inch pieces (about 3 C)
1 bay leaf
Coarse salt
1 C heavy cream, plus more if needed for reheating souffles
3 T flour
1½ C whole milk, warmed
1/4 t nutmeg
1/4 t ground ginger
Freshly ground pepper
6 egg yolks
4 egg whites
sugar snap peas, baby asparagus, petite peas
1 T parsley finely chopped

Melt 2 T butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add shallot, chopped carrots, bay leaf, and 1 teaspoon salt. Cover, and cook, stirring occasionally, until carrots are tender, 10-15 minutes. (Reduce heat to medium-low and add 1-2 T water if needed to prevent carrots or butter from browning.) Stir in cream. Bring mixture just to a simmer, and immediately remove from heat; discard bay leaf. Puree mixture and transfer to a small bowl; set aside. Melt 4 T butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Stir in flour with a wooden spoon; cook, stirring constantly, 3 minutes. Whisk in warm milk gradually. Use a rubber spatula to scrape bottom and corners of pan. Reduce heat to low. Cook, stirring often to prevent lumps from forming, 5 minutes. Whisk in carrot puree, and remove from heat. Stir in nutmeg, ginger, and 1 t salt; season with pepper. Transfer to a large bowl; let cool. Preheat oven to 400. Lightly butter eight 6-ounce ramekins; set aside. Add yolks, one at a time, to carrot mixture, whisking well after each addition. Using a clean whisk or an electric mixer, beat egg whites until soft peaks form. Fold into carrot mixture. Ladle mixture into prepared ramekins, filling almost to the rims. Place ramekins in a roasting pan, and transfer to oven. Pour enough boiling water into pan to come about three-quarters of the way up sides of ramekins. Bake until souffles are puffed and set, and tops begin to brown, about 35 minutes. Using tongs, carefully transfer the souffles to a wire rack, and let cool 10 minutes. Before serving, bring a medium pot of water to a boil; add ½ t salt. Add baby vegetables and cook until bright and still firm, about 3 mins. Drain, return to hot pan; add 2 T butter and toss with parlsey. Invert each souffle onto a metal spatula, and then invert again onto a serving plate. Arrange baby vegetables around souffles. Garnish with pea shoots.

 


Winter Greens and Potato Frittata

frittata

 

Any chard – red, green, rainbow, baby – works well in this, but you can also substitute  spinach. Adding potatoes picks up on the traditional Spanish omelette concept and it makes this frittata filling enough for dinner, especially paired with a hearty fall green salad. The frittata also is tasty at room temperature and makes a great appetizer.  Danielle demoed this frittata at the US Botanic Garden in October and it was slurped up by a class of first-graders who were visiting from a local school, where the kids tend a community garden. The recipe was adapted from Fine Cooking.

6 ounces rainbow chard, washed
2 T canola oil
1 t fresh rosemary, finely chopped
3 C (about 1 lb) Yukon Gold potatoes, grated
1 C sweet onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
Pinch of red pepper flakes, optional
10 large eggs
6 ounces Gouda cheese, shredded

Preheat the oven to 400F. Separate the chard stems from the leaves and slice each ¼ inch thick. In a 12-inch oven-safe non-stick skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions, chard stems, grated potatoes and rosemary. Cook until soft and browned in spots, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and red pepper flakes, stir well and spread the mixture evenly in the skillet. Lightly beat the eggs in a medium bowl. Mix in the chard leaves and grated cheese and pour over the potato mixture. Transfer the skillet to the oven and bake until frittata is set, about 15 minutes. Let cool slightly before cutting and serving.


Asparagus-Stuffed Eggs

asp eggs

 

 

 

We updated this retro recipe – from Julia Child in the 60s – with modern touches like a little hit of curry, cayenne and lemon zest.  These deviled eggs have spring written all over them and with addition of pureed vegetables, they pack a lot more nutrients than more traditional deviled eggs. A variation on this is to replace the asparagus with fresh or frozen peas.  For your flavorings, you’d want to go half mayonnaise and half creme fresh, trade in the curry for chopped fresh mint leaves and skip the lemon zest, but add a teaspoon or so of Marsala and another of Worcestershire for that devil kick. We demoed this at Brookside April 16, 2014. Yield: 24 stuffed egg halves Read More


Five-Ingredient Potato Salad

potato saladSo there we were Memorial weekend, a small but dedicated foodie crowd of eight sitting down to a feast of Korean barbequed pork, Thai seafood salad, grilled eggplant, potato salad, blueberry-almond tartlets, all washed down with sangria. Just to get one more nation represented, we’d started the afternoon with a spread that I call Greek Platter (elsewhere on this very same website), which we nibbled while sipping our sangrias on the porch in the amber afternoon sun.
Did I mention the potato salad? Because that eclipsed the meal.  If we’d put out nothing but sangria and the potato salad, I dare say we’d have had just as happy guests as we did with the rest of the spread out there.  You’ll get no argument from me – this is killer potato salad. I was off on a search for the recipe after sampling the potato salad from our very own VA-grown BBQ chainlet Red, Hot and Blue. They produce an excellent potato salad, but now that I made my own version of their recipe, I’d say it’s even better when you make it yourself. Do yourselves all a favor and don’t bother cooking for your next cookout.  Just throw together this gem of a recipe – just five ingredients – slap some burgers on the grill and you’ll be viewed as an icon of culinary brilliance by all who dine that day.

Five-Ingredient Potato Salad

2.5# potatoes, red-skinned or a mix red-skinned and Yukon
4 eggs
1 C scallions, green tops only, washed and sliced into thin rings
1½ t celery seed
1¼ C mayonnaise
salt to taste

Wash potatoes and prick all over with a fork; place them in a plastic bag, leaving it open at one end. Put the bagged potatoes in the microwave and microwave on high, checking them after six minutes. Potatoes should be easily pierced by a fork.  If they are not cooked, continue microwaving another two to three minutes. Let them cool before removing from the bag. Meantime, hard boil the eggs, plunge into ice water when done. Peel eggs and chop roughly. Put them in a large mixing bowl. Add scallions and celery seed. Once the potatoes have cooled sufficiently, dice them into a large dice and add to the egg and scallion mixture. Add mayonnaise and gently toss so all the ingredients are well mixed.  Taste for salt (I usually add a dash or ¼ t).