Potato Fennel Chowder with Sausage

chowder

Make this with hot Italian sausage and you get a great spicy stewey soup.  Make it with sweet Italian sausage and you get a delicious dish that your whole family will love.  Make it with Kielbasa or andouille and you get a smoky, almost gumbo-like stew.   Adrienne demoed this at US Botanic Garden March 6 and again at Brookside March 13, 2014.  Adapted from Fine Cooking.  Serves 6-12, depending on whether it’s a main course or a starter. Read More


Chewy Amaretti Sandwich Cookies

ameritti

It’s really important to “age” the egg whites in this recipe.  Otherwise, you’ll get flat, crispy wafers, rather than the chewy consistency that makes these seem like real cookies. Aging means simply letting them sit out at room temperature for a while. If you don’t have a pastry bag, use the corner of a plastic bag to pipe the batter onto cookie sheets. The recipe comes from Deb Perelman who writes the Smitten Kitchen blog and just published her first cookbook, named after the blog. This recipe makes two dozen sandwiches. Read More


Fig & Orange Muffins (GF)

Adapted from Martha Rose Shulman, The New York Times

1 C dried black mission figs, chopped
1 C orange juice
1 C cornmeal or polenta (fine-ground cornmeal)
1 C Bob’s all-purpose Gluten-Free Baking Flour
¾ t xantham gum
¾ t sea salt
1 T baking powder
½ t baking soda
2 eggs
1¼ C buttermilk
¼ C honey
¼ C canola or safflower oil

Put the chopped figs in a bowl and pour in the orange juice; let steep for at least an hour, or overnight. Drain ¼ cup of the orange juice (this will probably be all that is left if you let the figs sit overnight), and add it to the buttermilk.

Preheat the oven to 350̊F. Butter a 12-cup muffin tin.

Sift together all the dry ingredients into a medium bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs with the buttermilk, orange juice, honey and oil. Working quickly, add the wet ingredients into the dry and then fold in the chopped figs. Don’t over mix, but be sure there isn’t any flour left in the bottom of the bowl. Using an ice cream scoop or spoon, fill muffin cups to the top. Bake 18-20 minutes, until lightly brown and well risen. Allow the muffins to cool before removing them from the tin. Makes 12 muffins. Store in an airtight container or plastic bag in the refrigerator, 2-3 days.  Muffins are best reheated in a toaster oven.


Cheddar & Mustard Whole Grain Muffins (GF)

Combining different grains and adding xantham gum results in a muffin that looks and tastes a lot like a wheat flour muffin. Adapted from Martha Rose Shulman, The New York Times

½ C amaranth or millet flour
½ C cornmeal or polenta (fine-ground cornmeal)
1 C Bob’s all-purpose Gluten-Free Baking Flour
¾ t xantham gum
½ t sea salt
2 t baking powder
1 t baking soda
2 eggs
2 T Dijon mustard
1¼ C buttermilk
1/3 C canola or safflower oil
1 C grated cheddar cheese (mild, medium or sharp)
½ C chopped walnuts – optional

Preheat the oven to 350̊F. Butter a 12-cup muffin tin.

Sift together all the dry ingredients into a medium bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, buttermilk, mustard and oil. Working quickly, add the wet ingredients into the dry and then fold in the cheese and walnuts. Don’t over mix, but be sure there isn’t any flour left in the bottom of the bowl. Using an ice cream scoop or spoon, fill muffin cups to the top. Bake 18-20 minutes, until lightly brown and well risen. Allow the muffins to cool before removing them from the tin. Makes 12 muffins. Store in an airtight container or plastic bag in the refrigerator, 2-3 days.  Muffins are best reheated in a toaster oven.


Gnocchi Without the G

gnocchiGluten-free gnocchi – call it nyocci?  This is really easy to make and so good you’ll want to make it like this all the time. There are so many ways to serve this pasta-like dish – from simply, with sauteed sage and grated parmesan to rich and complex with sausage, spinach and heavy cream, making it a meal.  Enough in this recipe to make several batches and freeze them for future use.

3 large baking potatoes (2#)
2 eggs, beaten
1½ C rice flour
1 C potato starch

Sauce

6-8 large sage leaves, roughly chopped
1/4 C olive oil or butter
salt and pepper to taste
pinch nutmeg
1/4 C grated or shredded parmesan

Cook potatoes either by baking in the oven (40 minutes at 400 degrees) or microwaving on high 10-20 minutes until done.  Or you can steam them whole.  Potatoes should be soft and fully cooked inside. Let them cool and peel off the skin and discard.  Grate the cooked potatoes or run them through a ricer if you have one, making sure no lumps remain. You should have about 6 C of fluffy potato meal. Add beaten eggs and work into potatoes with your hands or a fork until it forms a ball.  Add 1 C and ½ C potato starch.  Work in the dry ingredients until you have a dough-like ball, adding more dry ingredients, proportionally, as needed to keep the dough from falling apart.  Wrap in plastic and let it rest 20 minutes or longer. At this stage, it will keep several days in the refrigerator.

After about 20 minutes, cut the dough in quarters. Set aside three of the quarters. On a lightly rice flour-dusted surface, flatten slightly the remaining quarter with your hand; cut into half or thirds, each piece should be about the size of a plum.  Using the palms of your hands, roll each piece until it shaped like a snake.  Do this fairly quickly as the less you handle the gnocchi dough, the better it holds together.  Repeat with remaining sections, adding small amounts of flour as necessary to keep the dough from sticking.  Line up the two-three snakes and cut them into pieces about ½ ro 3/4 inches. To shape the gnocchi, roll them on the tines of a fork, or just cook them without shaping. You should have about 40 gnocchi or four servings. You may repeat with the remaining three quarters and store gnocchi in plastic bags and freeze them for future use, or you can freeze the remaining dough.

Fill a four-quart pot halfway with water and bring to a boil; drop in the gnocchi and continue to boil until all the pieces have risen to the top; cook a few more minutes and remove with a slotted spoon or drain into a colander.  While the gnocchi are cooking, heat oil or butter in a sauce pan and add chopped sage leaves; saute a few minutes until they begin to get crisp; add nutmeg and salt and pepper. Add drained gnocchi and toss.  Sprinkle with parmesan, serve