Turmeric and Ginger Tea

ginger-and-turmeric-tea-health-boosting_7

 

 

Great for what ails you! Turmeric and ginger both have anti-inflammatory properties, making this an ideal tea if you have a cold. It’s very comforting on a cold winter’s day, served piping hot. But it’s also refreshing as a summer pick-me-up, so keep it in mind when those seasonal allergies strike. It’s also a very good digestive. Fresh turmeric is available at Harris Teeter, Whole Foods, Wegman’s and Asian supermarkets. Fresh ginger is widely available at supermarkets. Adrienne demoed this at Brookside and USBG in January 2016.

Two 2½-inch pieces fresh turmeric root, finely grated
2-inch piece fresh ginger root, finely grated
Few grinds of black pepper
1/4 t ground cinnamon
1/4 C honey
Freshly squeezed juice of ½ a lemon

Combine ingredients in a small jar or bowl. Stir until well blended. Cover with a lid, and store in the fridge. To make the tea, heat 8 ounces of water in a cup and add one teaspoon of the ginger-turmeric mixture. Garnish with a grinding of black pepper.


Citrus Salad with Spiced Honey

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1 (3-inch) cinnamon stick
1 bay leaf
1 t peppercorns (black, pink or Sechuan)
1/4 t dried crushed red pepper
4 whole cloves
5 cardamom pods
3 medium-size oranges
3 mandarin oranges
2 Ruby Red grapefruit
2 limes
3 Meyer lemons
6 kumquats (optional)
Fresh pomegranate seeds
Toppings: extra virgin olive oil, fresh mint leaves, sea salt

Bring first 6 ingredients and ½ C water to a boil over medium-high heat. Boil gently – honey boils over faster than milk! – stirring often, 1 minute. Remove from heat, and let stand 30 minutes. Meanwhile, peel oranges, next 3 ingredients, and, if desired, kumquats. Cut away bitter white pith. Cut each fruit into thin rounds. Arrange on a serving platter, and sprinkle with pomegranate seeds. Pour honey mixture through a fine wire-mesh strainer, discarding solids. Drizzle fruit with desired amount of spiced honey; reserve remaining for another use (such as flavoring iced tea). Top with a drizzle of olive oil, a handful of mint leaves, and sea salt.

Note: Salad may be made up to a day ahead. Prepare as directed; cover and chill up to 24 hours. Bring to room temperature to serve.


Triple Squash Soup

squash

 

The back story on this post, which pulls out a recipe from the archives (Danielle demoed this at Brookside and USBG this year ago) is that Adrienne discovered a (new) squash: Butterkin. Daughter Evangeline, coming in from Boston, wanted to try a pumpkin galette as a hardy vegetarian main course for our family gathering yesterday around Danielle’s table in her Washington DC home. The recipe (stay tuned) called for pumpkins but Evangeline wanted to make it with butternut. The shape wasn’t working however, so off we went to find small pumpkins that would work better. And there, in the hard-squash bins, was a Butterkin — butterkina cross between pumpkin and butternut! So lovely to look at — the skin the nut-color of butternut, the inside flesh like a persimmon — and the perfect size.

So how do we get to the soup? Well, there was quite a bit left over after the galette was executed.  But that wasn’t all. At the farmer’s market earlier in the week, Adrienne fell under the spell of some gorgeous striped squash, which she mistook for Delicata — the vendor concurred as to its pedigree, so her mistake was not entirely without reason. After battling mightily with the squash in an unsuccessful attempt to slice it, she realized the squash was actually an acorn, albeit pale gold with lovely multi-hued stripes, not unlike the skin of Delicata. Well, the two are not interchangeable, especially in the Sweet and Sour Delicata recipe Adrienne was making for the T’G table, so the hard-shelled acorn squash ended up in the crisper, along with the leftover Butterkin. Lo, we have the ingredients for Triple Squash Soup (counting Butterkin as two squashes in one).  This soup is a nice extension of the glories of the Thursday feast, but light enough to merit space on the Friday or Saturday table — or any time during the winter, for that matter.

1 (about 3 lbs.) small pie pumpkin
1 (about 1½ – 1¾ lbs.) acorn squash
1 (about 1½ – 2 lbs.) butternut squash
1 medium onion, chopped
1 apple, peeled and roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon fresh ginger, minced
2 tablespoons honey
2½ teaspoon curry powder
¼ t cayenne
1 can lite coconut milk
4-6 cups vegetable broth
Salt to taste

Roast the squash: cut each squash in half, put face down on a cookie sheet, add about 1 cup of water to the pan. Roast in 375̊ oven for 40-50 minutes, until soft. Cool, remove seeds, scrape flesh from half of each squash into a bowl and set aside. You want to yield about 2½- 3 lbs. of flesh. (This step can be done up to three days in advance)

Make the soup: heat 2 Tbs. olive oil in a large stock pot, sauté the onions until soft. Add the garlic, ginger, curry powder, cayenne and apple, stir well and let cook two or three minutes. Add the squash and broth, bring to a boil, reduce heat to a simmer. Add coconut milk, honey and continue simmering for another 30-45 minutes, until all ingredients are very soft. Puree the soup, with a hand-help machine, a blender, or pureeing in batches with a food processor. Adjust taste for salt. Garnish with paprika.  Serves 6-8.



Fig & Orange Muffins (GF)

Adapted from Martha Rose Shulman, The New York Times

1 C dried black mission figs, chopped
1 C orange juice
1 C cornmeal or polenta (fine-ground cornmeal)
1 C Bob’s all-purpose Gluten-Free Baking Flour
¾ t xantham gum
¾ t sea salt
1 T baking powder
½ t baking soda
2 eggs
1¼ C buttermilk
¼ C honey
¼ C canola or safflower oil

Put the chopped figs in a bowl and pour in the orange juice; let steep for at least an hour, or overnight. Drain ¼ cup of the orange juice (this will probably be all that is left if you let the figs sit overnight), and add it to the buttermilk.

Preheat the oven to 350̊F. Butter a 12-cup muffin tin.

Sift together all the dry ingredients into a medium bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs with the buttermilk, orange juice, honey and oil. Working quickly, add the wet ingredients into the dry and then fold in the chopped figs. Don’t over mix, but be sure there isn’t any flour left in the bottom of the bowl. Using an ice cream scoop or spoon, fill muffin cups to the top. Bake 18-20 minutes, until lightly brown and well risen. Allow the muffins to cool before removing them from the tin. Makes 12 muffins. Store in an airtight container or plastic bag in the refrigerator, 2-3 days.  Muffins are best reheated in a toaster oven.


Honey Ingots

photo tresbonbon

A meld of ground nuts and honey, these addictive little French cakes are called “financiers,” (ingot) for their golden sheen and traditional rectangular shape.  A muffin tin is a more commonly available alternative. This recipe produces about 20 mini-muffins; they freeze well. They are served after a meal with coffee.

6 T butter
1/3 C honey
1 C blanched almonds, pine-nuts, hazelnuts or a combination of light-colored nuts
1/3 C sugar
3 T flour
1/4 t salt
2 eggs or 4 egg whites
extra butter for the muffin pan

Melt butter in a pan over medium heat and simmer gently until it begins to turn brown and smell nutty, about two minutes. Remove from heat and stir in the honey. In a food processor, combine the nuts and sugar and process until the nuts are finely ground; add the flour and salt, pulse to combine. Pour in the butter-honey mixture and pulse to combine thoroughly. Add the eggs one at a time, or the egg whites one-half at a time, pulsing each time to mix well. Pour the batter into a plastic bag and refrigerate for an hour and up to a day. To bake, preheat oven to 350. Prepare the mini-muffin tins by buttering lavishly. Remove the bagged batter from the refrigerator and with scissors snip a corner of the bag to form an opening about 1/4 to 1/2-inch. Pipe the batter into the muffin tin, filling each mold about two-thirds up. Bake 16-20 minutes until golden. Remove from the oven and cool before trying to unmold. Serve at room temperature or slightly warm. The cakes will keep four or five days in the refrigerator in a plastic bag.