Provençal Leeks

provencal-leeks

 

We learned this recipe quite literally at our mother’s apron strings. As children, we spent summers on the beach of a coastal small village on the Cote d’Azur. Our mother occasionally brought in Madame Victoria, an elderly woman from Provence who then lived in St. Maxime, where she cooked and cleaned.  She taught our mom a lot about the cuisine of the region, leeks Povençal being a classic favorite. Mom made it every spring when leeks were abundant in the marchés near the village outside Paris where we lived. Danielle made this for our alluim ,month, May 2016.

3 medium-sized leeks, trimmed and washed and cut into 2-inch pieces
3 tomatoes, or 1 (15-oz) can, cut into eighths
¼ C pitted black Kalamata or green olives
Zest and juice of 1 lemon
1 clove garlic, minced
1 t Herbes de Provence
¼ C white wine
¼ C olive oil
Sea salt and pepper

Preheat the oven to 400F. Trim and clean the leeks: remove one outer layer of the leek and remove the dark green top. Slit the leek vertically and rinse under running water to remove and sand or dirt. Cut the leeks into 2-inch pieces, removing any additional dark or touch pieces. You want to be left with the white and light green parts only. Put the trimmed, washed and cut leeks into an ovenproof baking pan.

In a separate bowl, mix the tomatoes, olives, lemon juice and zest, garlic and Herbes de Provence. Spread mixture over the leeks, mixing gently. Add the white wine and olive oil. Season with a bit of sea salt and pepper. Bake uncovered 20-30 minutes until leeks are very tender. Serve warm or chilled on a hot summer day. Serves 4-6.


Leeks Mimosa with Toasted Hazelnuts

Dorie Greenspan Leeks Vinaigrette with Mimosa on eatlivetravelwrite.com

 

 

Begin this simple, distinctive side dish by roasting leeks, which mellows them and brings out their sweet side. Give them a drizzle of citrus vinaigrette, and sprinkle on toasted hazelnuts for a pleasant crunch. As a garnish, grated egg yolks are called mimosa (named for the yellow mimosa flower); we use the whites as well, to finish the dish. This recipe is a hearty side dish for four. Store extra vinaigrette in the refrigerator up to three weeks. Adrienne demoed this as part of allium month, May 2016. Recipe adapted from Martha Stewart.

4 large leeks (2 pounds), white and pale-green parts only, halved lengthwise and rinsed well
Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
2 eggs, hardboiled and cooled
1 t Dijon mustard
2 t finely grated orange zest, plus more for garnish
3 T fresh orange juice
1 T fresh lemon juice
1 T minced shallot
3 T extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for brushing
1 ounce (¼ cup) skinless hazelnuts, toasted and chopped

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Arrange leeks on a rimmed baking sheet, and brush generously with oil. Season with salt and pepper. Roast, flipping once, until tender and gold, about 20 minutes. Let cool slightly on sheet. Halve eggs and remove yolks. Finely grate whites on the medium holes of a box grater; place in a small bowl. Grate or crumble yolks; place in another small bowl. Whisk together mustard, orange zest and juice, lemon juice, and shallot. Slowly add oil, whisking until emulsified. Season with salt and pepper. Arrange leeks on a platter. Scatter whites and yolks on top. Drizzle with vinaigrette. Sprinkle with hazelnuts, and garnish with orange zest. Serve immediately.



Curried Parsnip and Apple Soup

ParsnipSoup (7)This rich, tasty pureed soup comes from the archives of Fine Cooking, with some of our own adaptations. Adrienne has made this using sweet potatoes instead of Yukons, with splendid results and if you are avoiding carbs on general principle, you can leave out the potato altogether. You may find that you have to add more broth or water at the end, after pureeing, in order to get the consistency just right. That’s because all these vegetables vary widely in how much juice they each contain — the fresher and younger the fruit or veggie, the juicier it will be and vice versa. Regardless, the meld of flavors here is just terrific and this will most certainly become a favorite winter soup. Demoed at Brookside and USBG in September 2014. Read More


BLT Pasta

blt pasta2 strips thick-sliced bacon, diced or 4-5 strips turkey bacon, diced
1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes, halved or 1 large ripe tomato, cut into large dice
½ t sugar
1 leek, washed, trimmed and thinly sliced
¼ C dry white wine
½ C chicken broth
1 t red wine vinegar
Dash of red pepper flakes, optional
1 large handful baby spinach leaves

4 ounces bucatini or spaghetti, cooked according to package

For the bread crumbs:

1 C (about one ½” – thick slice) French or rustic country bread, cubed
1 garlic clove

Make the bread crumbs: mince the garlic in a food processor, add the cubed bread and process until coarse. Heat 1 teaspoon olive oil in a non-stick skillet over medium heat and add the crumbs. Toast until golden brown, about 3-4 minutes, stirring often. Set aside.

Sauté the bacon in a large non-stick skillet over medium heat. Cook until crisp, then drain the pieces on a paper towel-lined plate. Pour off all but 1 tablespoon of drippings. If using turkey bacon, heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in the skillet and sauté bacon until browned (turkey bacon will not crisp up like thick-cut bacon). Remove bacon bits from skillet, add another splash of olive oil if necessary. Add the cut tomatoes and sugar, cook about 5 minutes, until tomatoes begin to caramelize. Add the leeks and cook until wilted, 3-4 minutes.

Deglaze the tomatoes with wine, simmer until liquid is nearly evaporated. Add the broth, vinegar, pepper flakes and simmer until reduced by 1/3. Add the spinach, bacon pieces and cooked spaghetti. Toss to coat, season with salt and pepper. Divide the pasta between two plates and sprinkle with bread crumbs before serving. Serves 2.


Spring Edamame Soup

edamame

This soup goes together very quickly and begs to be served immediately so the lovely spring vegetables retain their bright green color don’t get overcooked.  If you have leftovers, however, they will still be delicious reheated, if not quite as pretty. Adrienne demoed this at Brookside Gardens in Wheaton MD February 19, 2014.  This soup came from Cuisine magazine’s Splendid Soups special.

2 T olive oil
3 oz diced proscuitto or pancetta
2 C diced leeks
1 T minced garlic
2 t oregano
½ t red pepper flakes (optional)
1/4 C white wine
4 C chicken or vegetable broth
3 C frozen shelled edamame
1 C chopped zucchini
1 C chopped asparagus
1/3 C sliced fresh basil
1/4 C chopped fresh mint
1 T lemon juice
salt and pepper
shaved Parmesan or Pecorino
lemon zest

Heat olive oil in a large pot; add diced meat and saute until crisp.  Remove with a slotted spoon and reserve.  Add next three ingredients and turn heat down to low-medium; cover pot and cook about 5 minutes until leeks and garlic are soft. Add white wine and cook until nearly evaporated.  Stir in broth, and bring to a boil.  Add edamame, zucchini and asparagus.  Reduce heat and simmer soup until vegetables are just tender. Remove from heat, add reserved proscuitto, basil, mind and lemon juice.  Stir in and taste for seasoning.  Serve immediately, garnished with shaved cheese and lemon zest.