Green Garlic Soup

green garlic

 

 

Green garlic is available for a very brief time in the spring and mainly at farmer’s markets. It resembles green onion (scallions), but has a flat, rather than tubular green top. Get it while you can! This recipe will serve six. Adrienne demoed it during our allium month, May 2016.

2 bunches green garlic (about 6-8 stalks)
1 good-sized onion
1 medium potato, such as Yukon Gold
2 T olive oil
4 C vegetable stockgarlic
salt & pepper
¼ C heavy cream
chopped chives for garnish

Prepare green garlic: Slice green part lengthwise and run under cold water to get out any grit. Remove root. Cut entire stalk and bulb into chunks and set aside. You should have about 3 C of green garlic. Peel and cut onion into chunks; you should have 1 C onion chunks. Wash and cut potatoes into chunks; you should have about ½ C potatoes. In a large pot or pan, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add all your vegetables. Reduce heat to low and cover. Cook 20 minutes until vegetables are soft. Add stock, salt, pepper. Cook another 10 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool. Using an immersion blender or a food processor, puree soup mix. Taste for seasoning, adding salt and pepper as needed. Add heavy cream and process until incorporated. Serve hot, garnished with chives.

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Colcannon

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We demoed this in March — actually the day before St. Patrick’s Day, so totally appropriate for a uniquely Irish dish. And still appropriate by the way. When is mashed potatoes not appropriate? Because we were doing a series on radishes, turnips and potatoes, we used the turnip and radish greens in the colcannon. Man, was that a hit! Something about the slight bitterness in the greens with the sweetness of potatoes — I love Yukons, in case you hadn’t heard that before. Don’t over mash any of this — potatoes or greens. A little chunkiness goes a long way.

2 to 2½ pounds potatoes of your choice, peeled and cut into large chunks
Salt
5-6 T butter (with more butter for serving)
3 lightly packed cups of chopped kale, cabbage, chard, or other leafy green
1 bunch green onions (including the green onion greens), minced (about 1 C)
1/4 C milk or cream

Put the potatoes in a medium pot and cover with cold water by at least an inch. Add 2 tablespoons of salt, and bring to a boil. Boil gently until fork tender (15 to 20 minutes). Remove potatoes to a colander, reserving the potato water. Bring potato water back to a boil and add greens; reduce to a simmer and cook 3 min. Pour into a sieve, reserving the water for another use as needed. Return pan to heat. Add butter, 3/4 C green onions and cooked greens; simmer gently about three mins until onions are wilted and most of the water has cooked off. Add the potatoes back in; mash with a fork or masher, mixing well with the greens. Add milk or cream until you have the right consistency (may not use the full cup). Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve colcannon with a knob of butter in the center. Serves 4-6.


Warm Potato Salad with Lemon-Herb Dressing

potatoes

 

 

Baby new potatoes are great in this. The golf-ball sized tubers start hitting farmers markets around April. Use a variety of colors –purple, yellow, red-skinned – if you can find them for maximum nutrition, or stick with red-skinned or yellow Yukons. We love the sweet flavor of the new potatoes in this recipe, but any type of boiling potato works for year-round goodness. If you have a culinary mandolin, use that to slice the potatoes, or better yet, the slicing bade on a food processor. The sauce comes out thick, almost like a chimichurri sauce. Mix and match herbs – tarragon, chives, parsley; or dill, parsley and chives; or basil, cilantro and chives. Mix your sauce in while the potatoes are still warm for maximum flavor, and also to “cook” the raw garlic, making it less harsh. You can serve it any temperature, though it is best either warm or room-temperature. One last thing – if you don’t have a steamer (and lots of us don’t), just boil these gently in about an inch or so of water, covered.  Demoed at USBG in March 2016. Recipe adapted from Fine Cooking.

1¾ lb. baby potatoes, sliced ¼-inch thick
Kosher salt
2 large cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 C lightly packed fresh flat-leaf parsley
½ C lightly packed fresh basil
½ C thinly sliced chives
1/3 C extra-virgin olive oil
Freshly ground black pepper

In a large, wide pot fitted with a steamer basket, bring about ½-inch of water to a boil over medium high heat. Arrange the potatoes in an even layer in the steamer and sprinkle with ½ tsp. salt. Cover and steam, carefully stirring every now and again, until the potatoes are just tender, five to six minutes. Drain and put them back into the hot pan, cover.

While the potatoes are cooking, finely grate the zest from the lemon and then juice the lemon. Put the zest in a food processor and set the juice aside. Add the garlic to the food processor and pulse a few times. Add the herbs and pulse to coarsely chop. Add the olive oil, 1t salt, and ½ t pepper and pulse until the mixture is fairly homogenous, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary. (Avoid overprocessing or the herbs will heat up and discolor; 10 to 12 pulses should do.) Add 3 T of the lemon juice and pulse once to mix.

Drizzle the herb mixture over the potatoes and toss gently to combine. Season to taste with more salt or lemon juice. Serve warm.


Lemony New Potatoes

fingerlingThis treatment of the new potatoes that will soon be showing up in farmer’s markets is full of do-aheads. Parboil your potatoes the day before you plan to serve them; the browning can be done a few hours ahead of time; assemble the rest of the ingredients and the last step of making the sauce will come together in less than five minutes. Ultimately, you can do the whole dish in advance and keep it warm in the oven or microwave it before serving. The recipe is adapted from Martha Stewart and was part of our March 2015 repertoire at Brookside and U.S. Botanic Garden.

1 # fingerling potatoes
1 T coarse salt
1 T olive oil
1 shallot, minced
1 garlic clove, minced
1/4 C chicken stock
2 T dry white wine
1 T fresh or 1 t dried thyme leaves
1 T butter, chilled
2 T fresh lemon juice
Salt & fresh ground pepper, to taste

Garnish
fresh thyme leaves or parsley
coarse salt

Cover potatoes with water in a pan. Add 1 T salt, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer until barely tender, 5 minutes. Drain potatoes, cool, and halve lengthwise. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add shallot and garlic, and cook until soft, about 2 minutes. Add potatoes, cut sides down, and cook until golden brown, about 10 minutes. Stir in stock and wine. Cook until liquid is reduced by a third, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat. Add thyme and butter, and stir until butter has melted. Stir in lemon juice, salt, and pepper. Garnish withm more thyme leaves or parsley and sprinkle judiciously with coarse salt.

 


Mexican-Inspired Quinoa Casserole

quinoaQuinoa is one of those slightly mysterious ingredients that nonetheless is becoming a staple in America’s kitchens. Hailing from its native Peru, quinoa’s tiny seed is packed with complete protein, anti-oxidants, fiber, anti-inflamatory agents, a whole range of essential enzymes, while still gluten and fat free. The grain, or seed, rinsed first to extract the bitter-tasting film it naturally secretes – then toasted dry and finally cooked until it corkscrews like a miniature fiddlehead – has a nutty, cereal-like flavor that becomes a canvas for anything from spicy hot peppers to sweet strawberries and everything in between. This dish borrows flavors from another South American country – Mexico. You don’t need much quinoa – here a scant half-cup, loaded with beans and corn and other ingredients, is transformed into a hearty dish that will fill the bellies of six to eight diners. Feeding the multitudes you might say. Danielle demoed this as part of a class at Brookside and another at US Botanic Garden in February 2015 when our topic was “hearty casseroles.” What a great turnout on a couple of very cold days.

½ C quinoa, cooked in 1 C vegetable broth or water (see below)
1 ½ C frozen shredded hash brown potatoes
1 T olive oil
1 red bell pepper, diced small
1 (15-oz) can black beans, drained and rinsed
1 C frozen corn
5-6 scallions, trimmed and sliced, white and green parts
½ C salsa – your favorite brand, mild, medium or hot
1 ½ T chili powder or chili seasoning
2 t oregano (Mexican preferred)
1 T fresh lime juice
1 ½ C shredded Mexican cheese blend, Fiesta blend or Cheddar – divided

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Cook the quinoa according to package directions. When the quinoa is cooked, transfer it to a large mixing bowl. Put the hash browns in a microwave-safe bowl and microwave until soft, about 2 minutes. Add the hash browns to the bowl with the quinoa.

In a medium-sized skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil and add the diced bell peppers. Sauté until tender crisp, about 3 minutes. Add them into the bowl, along with the black beans, corn, sliced scallions, salsa, chili powder and oregano. Mix well, add the lime juice and ¾ cup of the shredded cheese. Mix well again. Transfer the mixture to an 8×8 baking dish and sprinkle with remaining cheese. Cover with (non-stick) aluminum foil and bake for 35 minutes. Remove the foil and bake another 20 minutes, until cheese has melted. Serves 6.

Cooking Quinoa

For the best flavor and fluffiest texture, dry-toast the quinoa before adding the water: rinse the quinoa according to the package directions, then put it in a medium pot without oil or butter. Let the grains dry out a bit and toast until fragrant, about 5 minutes. Add the water, bring to a boil and cover with a lid. Simmer  10-15 minutes-do not stir the quinoa while it is cooking. This will allow it to cook evenly and steam holes to form. The quinoa is cooked when you see the grains form a little white spiral tail. This is the outer germ of the grain that twists as it cooks, but stays attached to the kernel.


Winter Salad of Root Vegebables with Lemon-Tahini Dressing

If yroastedou’re sick of roasted vegetables you can take a pass on the veggie ingredients in this salad but you shouldn’t skip the lemon tahini dressing which is delicious on nearly everything it touches, though I confess I have not tried it on chocolate icecream. I bet it would be fantastic on orange or lime sorbet. Just a thought, in the middle of winter when I’m longing for the beach. Meantime, as they say, slather the vinaigrette on a nice piece of fish – say halibut or striped bass or mahi – and pan fry or do what hubby is doing these days, madly using the Cuisinart electric panini grill, a great modern invention; he puts everything on it including the dish towels. One of those fish fillets would be awesome cooked on that baby and you’ll want to drizzle more of the lemon tahini sauce on the fish when you serve. Nuff said about that. I do not tire of anything that includes oven-roasted potatoes so here you’ll have those plus matchstick carrots and parsnips, which we always overlook when we roast vegetables, why I can’t say but there’s no explaining a lack of imagination. And if you’re up to here with cauliflower and you already have divined the dirty little secret about roasted broccoli – don’t ask me, you’ll need to discover it for yourself – then just leave it at that and toss your roots with some fresh greenery and have at it. Or just make a big jar of the tahini dressing and drink a cup for breakfast – you think I’m kidding. I, Adrienne, demoed this in January at Brookside and at US Botanic Garden. Adapted from Fine Cooking. 

16 small potatoes
3/4 C olive oil, divided (more as needed)
1 t salt, divided
fresh ground pepper
½ head cauliflower, curt into ½-inch florets
3 carrots, peeled and cut into matchsticks
1 parsnip, peeled and cut into matchsticks
1 clove garlic
1 1/4 C fresh parsley leaves, divided
1/4 C lemon juice
2 T tahini (International foods)
1 t honey (optional)
1/4 t ground cumin
1/4 t ground coriander
4 C sturdy lettuce greens, cut or torn into bite-sized pieces as necessary
½ C chopped fresh dill
4 oz crumbled goat cheese

Preheat oven to 400. Quarter potatoes, place in plastic bag or bowl; toss with 1-2 T olive oil, scant 1/4 t salt, several pepper grinds. Spread potatoes on rimmed baking sheet and roast in oven until golden, about 30 minutes, turning them halfway through. Place cauliflower plastic bag or bowl, add 1 T olive oil, 1/4 t salt, several pepper grinds; toss until well coated. Spread on one side of rimmed baking sheet. To plastic bag or bowl, add carrots and parsnips, 1 T olive oil, 1/4 t salt, several grinds pepper. Toss and spread root vegetables on baking sheet next to cauliflower. Place baking sheet in the oven and roast until golden, about 20 minutes. Remove potatoes and vegetables when done and cover to keep warm.

Place garlic and 1/4 C parsley in a food processor and process until minced; add remaining ½ C olive oil, 1/4 t salt, lemon juice, tahini, honey if using, cumin, coriander; process, adding more olive oil as needed, until smooth and creamy.

In a large bowl, toss together the remaining parsley, lettuce and dill with 1/4 C salad dressing. Place on a serving platter, top with warm vegetables, drizzle with remaining dressing and sprinkle with goat cheese. Serve immediately, or hold at room temperature for up to two hours.


Winter Greens and Potato Frittata

frittata

 

Any chard – red, green, rainbow, baby – works well in this, but you can also substitute  spinach. Adding potatoes picks up on the traditional Spanish omelette concept and it makes this frittata filling enough for dinner, especially paired with a hearty fall green salad. The frittata also is tasty at room temperature and makes a great appetizer.  Danielle demoed this frittata at the US Botanic Garden in October and it was slurped up by a class of first-graders who were visiting from a local school, where the kids tend a community garden. The recipe was adapted from Fine Cooking.

6 ounces rainbow chard, washed
2 T canola oil
1 t fresh rosemary, finely chopped
3 C (about 1 lb) Yukon Gold potatoes, grated
1 C sweet onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
Pinch of red pepper flakes, optional
10 large eggs
6 ounces Gouda cheese, shredded

Preheat the oven to 400F. Separate the chard stems from the leaves and slice each ¼ inch thick. In a 12-inch oven-safe non-stick skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions, chard stems, grated potatoes and rosemary. Cook until soft and browned in spots, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and red pepper flakes, stir well and spread the mixture evenly in the skillet. Lightly beat the eggs in a medium bowl. Mix in the chard leaves and grated cheese and pour over the potato mixture. Transfer the skillet to the oven and bake until frittata is set, about 15 minutes. Let cool slightly before cutting and serving.