Red Rice and Quinoa Salad with Orange and Pistachios

 

red riceWith a sumptuous blend of sweet and savory, this dish, from the great Isreali chef, is classic Yotam Ottolenghi. It’s a little bit Middle Eastern, a little bit European, and a lot delicious. Red rice, like black rice, is densely nutritious and incredibly flavorful, with earthy, nutty notes a long ways from the blandness of white or even brown rice.

¼ C shelled pistachios, toasted and chopped
1 C quinoa, cooked and cooled
1 C red rice, cooked and cooled (see instructions, below)
1 medium white onion, sliced
1 small zucchini, diced
½ C olive oil
grated zest and juice of one orange
2 T lemon juice
1 garlic clove, crushed
¼ t red pepper flakes
4 spring onions, thinly sliced
½ C dried apricots, roughly chopped
2 handfuls of arugula (optional)
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Saute the white onion in 4 tablespoons of the olive oil until golden; add zucchini and saute until crisp-tender. Let cool completely. In a large mixing bowl combine the rice, quinoa, cooked onion and the remaining oil. Add all the rest of the ingredients, taste and adjust the seasoning. Serve at room temperature.
TO COOK RED RICE: Heat 3 teaspoons olive oil in a medium size saute pan. When hot add 1 cup red rice. Fry, stirring, until rice is lightly browned and starting to pop like popcorn. Add 2 cups hot water and bring to a boil. Cover and cook, without stirring, for 20-25 minutes or until barely tender. Remove covered pan from heat and let rest for 15 minutes. Drain rice in a fine mesh strainer. Let cool.


Coconut Quinoa Bowl

quinoa

 

This recipe is a great way to use leftover cooked quinoa, but it is so delicious, you’ll be cooking up extra quinoa just so you can make this. While the nutty flavor of the quinoa is particularly nice in this combo, rice, bulgur or couscous would make good substitutes. For a gluten- (and carb-) free alternative, you could make cauliflower rice by grating it and steaming or sauteing it just enough to get rid of the raw flavor. Leftovers? Just slice up a fresh avocado and add some yogurt. This was such a hit at Brookside Gardens last fall, we thought we’d roll it out again for US Botanic Garden this month. This recipe was adapted from 101 Cookbooks.

2 C cooked quinoa
1 lemon
1 C yogurtkale
¼ t salt
2 t olive oil
½ C sliced or slivered almonds
½ C unsweetened shredded coconut
2 garlic cloves, peeled and mashed into a paste with ¼ t sea salt
4 C stemmed & shredded kale, from about 10 large leaves
1 avocado, pitted and sliced

Warm the quinoa. Grate the peel of the lemon and squeeze out the juice; reserve each separately. Stir salt into yogurt, drizzle with olive oil. Set aside. In a skillet over medium heat gently toast almonds; add coconut flakes and mashed garlic to the skillet. Remove skillet from heat and continue stirring until coconut is toasted and garlic is fully incorporated into nut mixture. Transfer skillet contents to a small bowl and reserve. Return skillet to heat; add a splash of olive oil, stir in the kale with a pinch of salt, and cook for just a minute, until the kale collapses a bit, and brightens. Squeeze a bit of lemon juice over it, and transfer out of the pan immediately.

To serve, combine half of the almond coconut mixture with the quinoa in a large bowl. You can serve this individually, or family-style. Top the quinoa with the kale, plenty of the salted yogurt, and top with the remaining almond mixture, avocado, and a generous squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Garnish with grated lemon.

Serves 4.


Mexican-Inspired Quinoa Casserole

quinoaQuinoa is one of those slightly mysterious ingredients that nonetheless is becoming a staple in America’s kitchens. Hailing from its native Peru, quinoa’s tiny seed is packed with complete protein, anti-oxidants, fiber, anti-inflamatory agents, a whole range of essential enzymes, while still gluten and fat free. The grain, or seed, rinsed first to extract the bitter-tasting film it naturally secretes – then toasted dry and finally cooked until it corkscrews like a miniature fiddlehead – has a nutty, cereal-like flavor that becomes a canvas for anything from spicy hot peppers to sweet strawberries and everything in between. This dish borrows flavors from another South American country – Mexico. You don’t need much quinoa – here a scant half-cup, loaded with beans and corn and other ingredients, is transformed into a hearty dish that will fill the bellies of six to eight diners. Feeding the multitudes you might say. Danielle demoed this as part of a class at Brookside and another at US Botanic Garden in February 2015 when our topic was “hearty casseroles.” What a great turnout on a couple of very cold days.

½ C quinoa, cooked in 1 C vegetable broth or water (see below)
1 ½ C frozen shredded hash brown potatoes
1 T olive oil
1 red bell pepper, diced small
1 (15-oz) can black beans, drained and rinsed
1 C frozen corn
5-6 scallions, trimmed and sliced, white and green parts
½ C salsa – your favorite brand, mild, medium or hot
1 ½ T chili powder or chili seasoning
2 t oregano (Mexican preferred)
1 T fresh lime juice
1 ½ C shredded Mexican cheese blend, Fiesta blend or Cheddar – divided

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Cook the quinoa according to package directions. When the quinoa is cooked, transfer it to a large mixing bowl. Put the hash browns in a microwave-safe bowl and microwave until soft, about 2 minutes. Add the hash browns to the bowl with the quinoa.

In a medium-sized skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil and add the diced bell peppers. Sauté until tender crisp, about 3 minutes. Add them into the bowl, along with the black beans, corn, sliced scallions, salsa, chili powder and oregano. Mix well, add the lime juice and ¾ cup of the shredded cheese. Mix well again. Transfer the mixture to an 8×8 baking dish and sprinkle with remaining cheese. Cover with (non-stick) aluminum foil and bake for 35 minutes. Remove the foil and bake another 20 minutes, until cheese has melted. Serves 6.

Cooking Quinoa

For the best flavor and fluffiest texture, dry-toast the quinoa before adding the water: rinse the quinoa according to the package directions, then put it in a medium pot without oil or butter. Let the grains dry out a bit and toast until fragrant, about 5 minutes. Add the water, bring to a boil and cover with a lid. Simmer  10-15 minutes-do not stir the quinoa while it is cooking. This will allow it to cook evenly and steam holes to form. The quinoa is cooked when you see the grains form a little white spiral tail. This is the outer germ of the grain that twists as it cooks, but stays attached to the kernel.



Jeweled Quinoa

jewel

Even the quinoa (kee-noo-ah) gleams in this beautiful, mouth-watering jewel of a dish.  If you’ve never had the grain before, this is a great introduction.  If you have, then add this salad to your repertoire.  Quinoa is widely available in the rice and grain aisle of your local supermarket or in the health food section.

1 C quinoa, red, black or white or a combination
2 C water
2 T olive oil
1  T minced fresh ginger
1 clove or 1 t minced fresh garlic
1 small carrot, diced (about ½ cup)
1 celery stalk, diced (about ½ cup)
½ red AND yellow pepper, diced (about 1 cup)
½ C peas, frozen is fine
3 scallions, thinly sliced (discard dark green part)
Juice and zest of 1 lemon
Sea salt and pepper to taste
Chopped fresh parsley, dill, mint or basil for garnish (optional)

For the best flavor and fluffiest texture, dry-toast the quinoa before adding the water: rinse the quinoa according to the package directions, then put it in a medium pot without oil or butter. Let the grains dry out a bit and toast until fragrant, about 5 minutes. Add the water, bring to a boil and cover with a lid. Simmer  10-15 minutes-do not stir the quinoa while it is cooking. This will allow it to cook evenly and steam holes to form. The quinoa is cooked when you see the grains form a little white spiral tail. This is the outer germ of the grain that twists as it cooks, but stays attached to the kernel.

While the quinoa is cooking, prepare the vegetable medley. Heat the olive oil in a non-stick sauté pan, add the garlic and ginger and stir until the ginger is aromatic but not colored, about 2 minutes. Add the carrots and sauté another minute; stir in the remaining vegetables and sauté just long enough for the vegetables to heat through, about three minutes. Remove from heat, add the cooked hot quinoa, season with lemon juice and zest, a little more olive oil, salt and pepper. Garnish with fresh herbs.  Serve, hot, warm or at room temperature. Serves 4-6.