Peach & Heirloom Tomato Salad

marinated-peach-tomato-salad-recipe_xlg3 C Sherry Vinegar and Rosemary Marinated Peaches, drained, marinade reserved

1 t Dijon mustard
4 large heirloom tomatoes (about 2 lb.), cored and sliced into 1/2-inch-thick rounds Flaky sea salt, such as Maldon, and freshly ground black pepper

8 medium fresh mint leaves, torn

 

In a small bowl, whisk together the reserved marinade and the Dijon; it’s OK if it doesn’t emulsify. Arrange the tomato slices on 4 plates or a platter, top with the peaches, and drizzle some of the vinaigrette over the top. Season lightly with salt and pepper and garnish with the mint. Pass any remaining vinaigrette at the table. Serves 4.

 

 

Sherry Vinegar and Rosemary Marinated Peaches

This savory marinade balances peaches’ natural sweetness with the complex tartness of sherry vinegar. Fresh rosemary adds earthy pine notes, olive oil lends richness, and rum contributes a bit of spice. The marinade also softens the skins, which means you can skip the tedious task of blanching and peeling the peaches. These peaches are delicious in salsas, salads, topping flatbreads and pizzas, and in braises.

 

3 medium ripe peaches, pitted and sliced, diced, or cut into wedges

1/3 C extra-virgin olive oil
2 ½ T spiced dark rum (optional)
2 T sherry vinegar

2 t finely chopped fresh rosemary Pinch kosher salt
Pinch of sugar

Gently combine all of the ingredients in a medium bowl and let marinate at room temperature for at least 20 minutes and up to 24 hours. After marinating, you can refrigerate the peaches for up to 1 day.

 

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Sweet & Sour Delicata Squash

sweet & sour

Found this recipe on the Yellow House blog, written by food and garden blogger Sarah Searle, who also lives in rural VA. She credits Domenica Marchetti’s “The Glorious Vegetables of Italy” for the original recipe. Haven’t gone back to look at the original, but I adapted a tad after I demoed it  at Brookside Gardens October 22, 2014. I like red pepper flakes, what can I say. Delicatas, incidentally, are a lovely mesh of summer and winter squash — they have the dulcet sweetness of a butternut, but you don’t peel them and the skin, while not absent like a zucchini, is soft and pleasantly chewy. You could also substitute butternut — or use both. Read More