Corn Chowder Salad

Crispy bacon and hearty potatoes bring the flavors of the classic summer soup to create a side dish perfect with grilled vegetable, fish, chicken or steak.

3 small red potatoes (about 2 cups), diced

3 strips thick-cut bacon

2 ears corn, kernels removed from the cobs (about 2 cups)

1/3 cup sour cream

2 scallions, thinly sliced

2 teaspoons apple-cider vinegar

1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme leaves or ½ teaspoon dried thyme

¼ teaspoon smoked paprika

1 teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon ground black pepper

½ cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Wash and cut the potatoes into ½-inch dice and put them into a small pot of boiling water. Cook 8-10 minutes, until tender when pierced with a knife. Drain into a colander and set aside.

In a large skillet over medium heat, cook the bacon, until crisp, about 10 minutes. Transfer the bacon to a plate. When cool, crumble and set aside. Drain all but 1 tablespoon of fat from the pan. Add the corn and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the kernels are bright yellow and crisp, about 3-5 minutes.

In a small bowl, mix together the sour cream, sliced scallions, vinegar, thyme, paprika, salt and pepper. Add the potatoes, parsley, and bacon to the corn, and toss with the dressing. Season to taste with salt and pepper, and sprinkle with parsley. Serve at room temperature. Serves 4-6.


Mushroom Sour Cream Salad

mushroom

 

 

Trying to eat “light” in the lead-up to this week — three Christmas dinners on the calendar and that doesn’t include the famous Garreau tortiere, handed down to Adrienne from her late mother-in-law. That recipe may not be ready to post just yet, but this mushroom salad certainly is. It’s light yet satisfying, even — dare we say it for a salad? — comforting. The combination of the sour cream and walnuts is part of that. But, in a non-obvious way, the mushrooms themselves have both a meatiness and an almost souffle-like airiness. Use the freshest mushrooms you can find and stick with real sour cream if at all possible to get the creaminess just right. The salad needs at least a half-hour for the flavors to meld and the mushrooms to release some of their moisture into the dressing.

1/4 C chopped walnuts
2 C sliced very fresh white button mushrooms (about one 8-oz box)
1/3 C sour cream
2 T lemon juice
1/4 C minced scallions, green and white parts combined
1/4 t cayenne pepper
salt and black pepper to taste
chives for garnish

Toasting the walnuts is optional, but I like them better that way. Heat a non-stick pan on medium; add walnut pieces and toast until you get a good, nutty perfume and they are golden. Do not scorch. This will take about five minutes. Remove from heat and cool. In a large bowl, combine the remaining ingredients, except the chives. Add the walnuts; toss well and set the salad aside to marinate for at least a half-hour. You can also make it up to one day ahead of time. Garnish with chives and serve. Two to three servings.


panna cotta

Panna Cotta translates as “cooked cream,” but in this recipe it is not so much cooked as warmed and then thickened with gelatine and sour cream to achieve the thick, heavy cream found in Italy’s Piedmont region, where this dish originated. We demoed this recipe at Brookside Gardens on December 6, 2013, accompanied by mandarin oranges and chocolate syrup. It is also delicious all on its own.  Use heavy cream, not ultrapasturized, which contains additives, and be sure the sour cream contains only cream and culture, no other additives. This recipe unmolds with a soft, creamy finish. For a firmer panna cotta, increase the gelatin to 1 3/4 teaspoons. Serves eight full-sized desserts; up to 24 minis. Recipe from Splendid Table. Read More


Cajun Chicken Stroganoff

Photo courtesy main.kitchendaily.com


This comes together fast and is packed with flavor.  Not too spicy to serve even to those who stay away from the heat.  Carb-watchers can sub out cooked spaghetti squash for the egg noodles.  Just put two halves of a spaghetti squash in the microwave and nuke for 10 minutes.  Discard the seeds, and scoop out the spaghetti-like flesh. Read More