Twice Times Sweet Potatoes in Coconut

For “Top-to-Toe” demoes for the month of April 2016, Danielle and Adrienne brought new ways to prepare beet tops and bulbs and sweet potato green and tubers to audiences in the Washington metro area. This one was a big hit. Don’t have access to sweet potato greens? Don’t worry, just use spinach.

2 sweet potatoes, peeled and diced to yield 3 C
1 large bunch sweet potato greens, washed and sripped of their stems
2 T oil – coconut, olive or vegetable
2 shallots, minced
2 clove garlic, minced
1 t minced fresh ginger root (from a ½-inch piece)
2 t grated fresh turmeric root, or 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
1 hot chile pepper, red thai chili or serrano, finely sliced
2-inch lemon grass stalk, trimmed and finely sliced
1 to 2 t soy sauce, or to taste
1 C coconut milk
1 t brown sugar, or to taste
Salt and pepper, to taste

Prehat oven to 425 degrees. Toss the diced sweet potatoes in a bowl or bag with 1 T oil (if you use coconut oil, warm it up first). Spread oiled potatoes onto a cookie sheet. Roast 15 minutes, then turn potaotes and continue roasting until they are done and slightly caramelized. While the sweet potaotes are cooking, bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil. Trim off any thick stems from greens. Add to boiling water and blanch for 60 seconds, then immediately transfer greens to a bowl filled with ice water to stop the cooking. Drain well.

Heat 1 T oil in a large pan or wok over medium heat. Add shallots, garlic, ginger, turmeric, chile and lemongrass and stir until fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in soy sauce. Add coconut milk and bring to a simmer. Add blanched greens and return to a boil; reduce heat to low and simmer for 2 minutes. Add sugar and season with salt and pepper to taste. Spoon into bowls and serve with roasted sweet potatoes and rice.


Sweet and Savory Sweet Potato Greens

yam

Yes, you CAN eat the green tops of sweet potatoes that curl and snake above the tubers themselves, tucked safely below the earth. Sweet potato greens — sold in Asian supermarkets as “yam leaf” — in fact come in a variety of color and shape these days, with their growing popularity as ornamental vines. They taste a lot like spinach, are packed with nutrients and farmers are discovering a burgeoning market for these once-tossed-away side harvest to the perennial favorite tuber of fall. Look for the greens in your local farmer’s market — or CSA – starting in June and going through the fall harvest of sweet potatoes. This recipe was demoed by Adrienne in April 2016 as part of our “Top-to-Toe” month.

8 C sweet potato/yam leaves, stems removed, washed
1 T olive oil
½ onion, diced
½ t Dijon mustard
2 t sugar
½ t hot pepper flakes
1 t salt
1-2 T cider vinegar
3/4 C vegetable or chicken stock
2 T dried cranberries
2 T chopped nuts

Heat olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and cook and until softened and translucent, about two min.; add garlic and cook another two minutes until garlic is fragrant. Combine mustard, sugar, salt, hot pepper flakes, one tablespoon vinegar and add to pan, stirring the ingredients together until sugar is dissolved and they are well incorporated. Add stock and bring to a boil over high heat. Stir in the sweet potato leaves, cover and turn heat down to a simmer. Stir in the cranberries and continue simmering until the liquid has reduced by about half, and the cranberries have softened, about 10 min. Season to taste with pepper and more vinegar as desired. Sprinkle with nuts before serving.
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